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Kenadian

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Posts posted by Kenadian

  1. Well, Atlanta also chose a great piece of music (Beethoven's 9th Symphony - Ode to Joy), but an awkward pause at the end took away from the moment and since it is the anthem of Europe, it somehow seemed 'un-American'. Then again, so did Shostakovich's 5th Symphony in Salt Lake.

    Los Angeles also used great music, specially composed by Phillip Glass. "The Olympian" I believe.

    But I hated those honking horns they used Seoul and that cheesy synthesized pre-techno music they used in Munich.

    I don't mind Montreal's music - a few horns and a drum roll - but the Olympic Cantata they performed after really put a wonderful focus on the flame, giving it a solid 5 minutes as the centre of attention.

  2. I personally don't mind that the flame/cauldron is likely to be in the stadium. Given the design of the London Olympic Stadium and the park, it really just makes sense to keep it in there. All those protruding triangles and wires hanging about the place and the Orbit tower next door would make a rooftop or tall tower cauldron just seem a bit clumsy. An in-stadium flame would be much more suitable to the environment it is in.

    But in my mind, I still think as I have all along that the cauldron is lurking within the Tor. At the end of the ceremony, it will either rise up through the Tor, ripping the ground to shreds emerging in an almost violent eruption of steel and fire, or the Tor will somehow disappear quietly in the dark of the night and a shiny cauldron will emerge in its place.

  3. Given that he is a basketballer and competed in Sydney, Steve Nash was probably the most questionable of the 4 Vancouver cauldron lighters (there were 4 chosen, not 5 as Rick Hansen wheeled the flame into the stadium and I guess in a way only 3 as Catriona didn't really get to light it until the closing ceremony as her 'arm' didn't raise), the organizers likely felt he earned that honour because he has done a lot for sport in BC and Canada.

    Frankly, I would have replaced Nash with Marc Gagnon, but VANOC wasn't listening to me. ;)

  4. Wow, that was quite a find! I've always wanted to see the Montreal Opening Ceremony and FINALLY...there it is! But...wow. Things sure have come a long way since 1976. Those long pauses. That awkward silence before the Olympic flag was raised. All the 'cultural' stuff happening after the flame was lit. And 'O Canada' being performed twice. Well, it was the 1970s and Montreal basically followed the exact same protocol of the previous 10 Olympiads or so. However, I did learn a few things. I did not know that the Snowbirds (the synchronized aircraft team at the beginning) were there (they were also in Calgary), did not know that the 'Youth of Canada' segment was as long as it was (only ever saw a few photos of ribbon twirlers) and did not know that it was that sunny during the ceremony. Some of the photographs made it look a bit overcast. And those girls in the white dresses...OMG, so 1970s! Also of note, the thing I had always read - that Queen Elizabeth stood the whole time during the Athletes Parade as a gesture of greeting and welcome to the delegations - was indeed true! Still a great find here. Thanks for posting!

  5. Well, gas is volatile, so all it needs to burn is the introduction of a spark or flicker of fire and it can leap into flame. That sometimes means that the torch doesn't have to touch the lip of the cauldron to make it work.

    That said, I've always felt that Torino's cauldron lighting was a bit 'faked' as the flame set off a pyrotechnics show and did not necessarily link the Olympic flame in the torch directly to the Olympic cauldron.

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