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Bull Schmidt

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Posts posted by Bull Schmidt

  1. Updates.

    https://www.registerguard.com/in-depth/sports/college/track-field/2021/04/01/look-inside-university-oregons-200-million-state-art-track-only-hayward-field/4833035001/

    It’s pretty nice. Official listed capacity is 12,650, expandable to 25,000 for the Worlds and for the Olympic Trials (so much for the 30,000 minimum, SMH). There are views from the open concourse that will probably be standing room along with bleacher space at the north end. 

    If anything, the pandemic helped by allowing for this year’s shakedown cruise. OTOH, they’re already refunding Olympic Trial tickets for this summer due to a realization that larger gatherings are still problematic (Oregon numbers had surged the last two weeks) and it is unrealistic to expect major improvement by mid-June. 

  2. In theory, we have had a year to get used to protocols, understand how the science works through the process, and do this safely. If I were involved in this process, I’d be advising that I think Tokyo can pull this off using the right measures.

    In practice, we have a substantial subset of several populations who think they know better than scientists and are off in their own reality. If the people of Japan were to ask me if those people can be kept away, I could answer that such people are far less likely to make the trip, but I couldn’t be 100% confident that some athletes wouldn’t go rogue.

    • Like 1
  3. On ‎5‎/‎28‎/‎2018 at 7:52 PM, Nacre said:

    The first render is for 30,000 seats, not 12,500.

    I remain unconvinced by this whole IAAF in Eugene fete. It seems to be a nakedly Nike managed event rather than any sort of grassroots American event. To put everything so completely in the hands of Phil Knight seems like a mistake to me. But so long as everyone agrees to it I suppose it's their choice; Adidas' world cup in Germany turned out fine.

    Do you have evidence stating the render is for 30,000? This has been a point of contention in the media ever since the release of this rendering...

  4. So this happened... http://www.oregonlive.com/trackandfield/index.ssf/2018/04/university_of_oregon_rolls_out.html

    Thing is, this is what the organizers say is the complete 12,500-seat POST-Worlds Hayward Field. What the organizers say is that they’ll put temporary bleachers in the gap in the northern part of the stadium. So that phallic errrrrrrrrrrr tower is a 9 story “admin and communications” building and observation deck... if that gap is it, the bleachers would have to be three times the height of that tower. A later interview “clarified” that they’d also stuff seats into the rest of the structure. 

    Having been to enough Major League Soccer facilities, I’d argue that structure looks like it holds a lot more than 12,500. Of course, never trust a rendering. I’m not the only person who gets the sense, in the end, that they’ll SAY there’s 30,000 people without coming all that close. If that rendering is close, however, I could easily see a post-Worlds structure with extra-wide seats and all the latest party-deck what-nots.

    People in Eugene are upset that the east grandstand is not being preserved. It’s nearly 100 years old, really rather iconic, et cetera, but it’s Phil Knight’s money and the university is steamrolling ahead. They MIGHT even have it ready for the re-bid 2020 US Olympic Trials. 

  5. This is already settled. I believe the pundits who surmised that Amazon already has a “general” metro in mind, but the bidding war will sweeten whatever incentives...

    ...that metro Washington can offer it. 

     

    That’s to say the people who hacked Amazon and noticed a lot of inquiries being made about Arlington County VA leaked the info and all.

    • Like 1
  6. http://www.oregonlive.com/trackandfield/index.ssf/2017/09/hayward_field_renovation_pushe.html#incart_river_home

    So now I wonder who Phil Knight is trying to squeeze for cash. The stink is starting to take hold.

    The 2020 Olympic Trials were already relocated. So if this actually gets done...

    ...oy vey...

    ...you're probably making the 2021 season (Ducks, Pre, NCAA) the shakedown cruise.

  7. I don't think you need any more translation than you already got.

    Mark Geiger refereed the Mexico v Panama semifinal, he called a late handball (Mexico had already had one dubious PK call to get through their quarterfinal against Costa Rica)... and later, Geiger admitted he made a mistake. All sorts of heck broke loose in Atlanta around that call, so lots of hurt feelings.

    Geiger also admitted to not necessarily refereeing in MLS the way he does in CONCACAF and mentioned something about "entertainment value" when approaching MLS games. He's been assigned to Seattle v Vancouver this weekend, and there's certainly some social media buzz about him being assigned to that. Of course, he refereed at World Cup last year, so he's close to untouchable with regards to USSF and MLS.

    Or, as we say around here, Panama got CONCACAF'd. Wasn't the first time. Won't be the last.

  8. Direct flight from New York to Eugene for this? Oh dear.

    It's simple. Fly to Portland. Take MAX downtown to Union Station. Take Amtrak to Eugene. Don't start spending the airlines' money for them. Fair bet Amtrak can add trains for this event more easily than airlines can add inventory.

    This is Nike's baby. Phil Knight will probably take care of stadium improvements and TEMPORARY expansion himself. Where there's generally a lot of bleachers, I'm guessing mostly a temporary concrete structure. I would expect an improvement and expansion of the main stands. The historic east side stand probably won't (and can't) be touched outside of some internal improvements. Of course, there might be a fair question about where capacity will actually be set... when it's possible that the big draw here could be enhanced NBC payout for the event and network prime time coverage. The real value may not be the spectator counts.

    The organizers are talking about a "village" for athletes. Maybe the bigwigs as well? I'm sure that was a sticking point for 2019 bidding. I could pose an unannounced idea: Boise has a complex with a 4-star hotel and an attached hockey arena. There are rumors of Oregon starting a varsity hockey program, the current hockey facility is inadequate, so a development like that somewhere between campus and downtown Eugene wouldn't surprise me. Finding ways to add hotel rooms locally would be somewhat smarter than keeping constant shuttles between Eugene and Portland, which is otherwise more likely.

  9. LOLOLOLOL!!!

    I'm giving up on all these sports organisations. IAAF also caves in, I'm willing to bet that this is a prelude to Doha Olympics, more so than any other event Qatar will host soon.

    An Olympics (in October) in Doha would make more sense than the World Cup.

    Corrupt. The Voting was obviously corrupt. Doha shouldn't have been given Hosting Rights for this. Barcelona had by far the Best Bid, Eugene even had a Better Bid then Doha. Barcelona should be Hosting the 2019 IAAF World Athletics Championships.

    Eugene was the 2nd place vote-getter. 15-12 in the final. Close, no?

    The explanation coming from here is that Barcelona was a longshot because London has 2017 and, given two bids outside Europe, IAAF saw that as preferable.

    So 2021 MAY go to Barcelona. Who knows if IAAF takes a flyer on Eugene two years after.

  10. when are they deciding this thing??

    It's almost 1 pm Monday Pacific Time. Approximately 15 hours from this post, we should see a voting result.

    http://registerguard.com/rg/news/local/32434883-75/tracktown-ready-to-make-its-bid-for-world-championships.html.csp

    I keep looking for some indications as to how Eugene's vote will fare. Hard to find. A column from last month probably lets you try to read between the lines... and Doha promises something that's a bit garish. However, for this event, at least it's not logistically impossible the way that, oh, a refrigerated football stadium might be.

    http://registerguard.com/rg/sports/32343895-81/will-the-spirit-movethe-iaafs-leaders.html.csp

  11. Eugene 2019 will happen if NBC throws in a good TV deal.

    One of the things I thought about after yesterday's writing:

    What's bigger in America? IAAF championships or Women's World Cup?

    That doesn't mean NBC isn't going to want these rights. The question is whether they get it because it's cheap for them. Outside Sunday Night Football, the Olympics themselves, and (very arguably) Notre Dame football, NBC doesn't flash the cash that's flying around these days.

  12. Funding in Oregon is a huge issue. They haven't been able to get a new stadium built for the Portland Timbers and likely won't until a private party kicks in all the money.

    IAAF championships are now held at ex-Olympic stadiums with 50,000 capacity or greater. Hayward field is not going to suffice, and the chances of Eugene building a stadium on the level of Stade de France, the Beijing Olympic Stadium, etc seem very, very low. Unless Nike donates a few hundred million.

    Don't compare U of Nike, excuse me, U of Oregon to Portland funding issues. If Phil Knight actually wanted to get something built in Portland, the money would be there. His taste for the major professional sports, other than as vehicles for shoe sales, is limited. Meanwhile, Knight donated the $100 million that cover the bonds for Matthew Knight Court, a $200 million (way more than needed for 12,500 seats) arena that's more than state-of-the-art. The last thing I'm worried about is whether Hayward Field will have enough seats by 2019. Many will be temporary, but that will get done.

    It'll also sell out if that can be helped.

    It's the remaining logistics that get interesting.

    Funding in Oregon is a huge issue. They haven't been able to get a new stadium built for the Portland Timbers and likely won't until a private party kicks in all the money.

    IAAF championships are now held at ex-Olympic stadiums with 50,000 capacity or greater. Hayward field is not going to suffice, and the chances of Eugene building a stadium on the level of Stade de France, the Beijing Olympic Stadium, etc seem very, very low. Unless Nike donates a few hundred million.

    Don't compare U of Nike, excuse me, U of Oregon to Portland funding issues. If Phil Knight actually wanted to get something built in Portland, the money would be there. His taste for the major professional sports, other than as vehicles for shoe sales, is limited. Meanwhile, Knight donated the $100 million that cover the bonds for Matthew Knight Court, a $200 million (way more than needed for 12,500 seats) arena that's more than state-of-the-art. The last thing I'm worried about is whether Hayward Field will have enough seats by 2019. Many will be temporary, but that will get done.

    It'll also sell out if that can be helped.

    It's the remaining logistics that get interesting. Can you get everyone into and out of Eugene daily (or find a way to add hotel rooms)? Will the athlete dorms already at Hayward be expanded? Luxury accommodations for IAAF officials?

  13. While I'd like to try and reason with everyone about ditching- or resolving- the arguments about debating, maybe I need to end this by addressing the elephant in the room.

    On one hand, I simply disagree with Athens; the numbers game is important because this isn't normal times for either the IOC or the USOC. If anything, it's important for any country to show the maximum possible support for the Olympics. (It doesn't mean I have to win the argument. Of course, out of principle, maybe I should misspell something. :D )

    OTOH... I stayed with my parents in a small town outside Atlanta (really, outside Athens) during the 1996 Olympics. We walk into the local Dairy Queen for a quick bite. There's six employees... separated by race. There was no way to spin that this was a comfortable feeling. Where Dallas is similar to Atlanta is the Old South problem. Since you're happening to host the world for a couple weeks, better projection might be required. Dallas might be a little better than that (my last visit there, it was obvious there that it's still inner city vs white suburbs)... but social readiness is more required than even we're probably comfortable addressing.

    California has its issues, but it scores better. Heck, Boston has known issues, but it tries. I know Washington is south of the Mason-Dixon Line, and I know staying in rural Maryland a couple nights reminded me of that... but it also has to represent a fair number of interests in its day-to-day work. My wife would have certainly had a problem with Dallas that she won't for the other cities... except there's a reason she left Fresno, and the Washington climate is a bit too similar.

    That doesn't mean Atlanta was a complete mistake... sometimes you have to try, take a stand (I think of what Sydney tried to do, for instance)... but this may not be the time to go on one of those adventures. I still think the numbers are important, however.

  14. Yikes... I obviously need the 400-level class on how to post other's quotes here. (Or the buttons just don't work?)

    Nacre thinks Boston would be most likely to defeat an effort by initiative. I think you're WAY underestimating San Francisco's ability to simply come out and riot the effort to death, not to mention the non-violent who would definitely go initiative petition at the earliest possibility...

    ...which is why, for Athensfan, the USOC didn't leave a big enough list. The point is to maximize competition to get more out of the bid city. In the current environment, you'll probably see attrition. 2 cities may not even last 4 months, for all we know. So perhaps (even though my previous post was an assessment that the USOC thinks the IOC wouldn't accept Dallas... which, when it rightly gets scrubbed, it was better to say here anyway) nothing should have been cut at this point. Dallas would probably, at least, hold its bid to the end of the USOC process. A Los Angeles anointment is not the optimal solution unless the IOC watches everyone else fall by the wayside.

    • Like 1
  15. You're almost to the point where you're going to have to throw out the existing bids and limit to recent hosts just to show that you're listening to most of the world.

    There's an anger about these things these days... and it's not just the Olympics.

    (Which reminds me to mention that, never mind the IOC's tone-deafness... better them than FIFA. You can go back as far as South Africa, and maybe even Germany, and come to the realization that FIFA's ExCo seems to have made this a stadium-building exercise when that should almost never be the case.)


    Excuse me... throw out the current 2022 bids and start over.

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