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kevzz

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Everything posted by kevzz

  1. Whats your prophecy for London's one then??
  2. I am downloading the ceremony again, hopefully with a second watching I will like it more... and discover things I'd miss.
  3. Anyone realized the look at the volleyball venue is slightly different? It's different shades of blue, green and white. Very nice!
  4. I like how they use the blue and green look in the Aquatics Centre. It blends in well with the colour of the water and the ETFE.
  5. I felt it was a 110% Chinese ceremony which incorporates all the stereotypical Chinese elements eg. thousands of dancers in formation. In this sense, they totally succeed in representing what the world thought about China. And yes it was great to see all these on a much grander scale. Maybe I was expecting something different, a different side of China to show the world, something that focus more on the simple, confucius aesthetic of peace. Maybe I kept having the image of the ceremony as a real life Zhang Yi Mou's House of Flying Dagger/ Heroes film which are truly beautiful and a side of Chinese arts we never seen before.
  6. LOL all athletes will be carrying a torch and it will seem like a torch-wielding mob going on a witch hunt! What I have in mind is not something so literal. Maybe they can somehow activate/ encourage the flame in reaching the cauldron by doing some simple action together on the field eg. clapping, thumping their feet or setting off some ignition-popper given to them before they parade into the stadium. Something that doesnt need rehearsing, something simple and spontaneous which turn all the focus to the thousands of athletes on the field during the climax. Cos to me they seem like some human props at the end of the show, filling up the empty field.
  7. I hope London can do something different with the cauldron lighting. I like the idea of having several athletes lighting it. Maybe it sounds ambitious, but it will be great if all the athletes on the field can be somehow involved in igniting the cauldron. This way, they can look forward to contribute to the climax of the show, instead of standing there and lingering around watching the show. This will bring greater meaning to the ideal of the flame.
  8. I see, I also wonder what's that. Thought he meant 8th dimension.
  9. I totally agree with you! I laughed out loud when those guys in the box popped out and waved and smiled to the crowd. It was kinda cheesy, to suddenly jumped out of their character as you said, from warrior to attention-loving teenagers.
  10. I totally agree with you. They are missing the 'story-telling factor' in this ceremony. Sydney and Athens is telling us a story with the ceremony, albeit a very historical one. But at least we can relate to it and there is a progression. In Beijing, it's too selective and suddenly you move from very traditional to a spaceman and a walking globe and the whole show finished with no climax. Bit dumbfounded.
  11. To me, the best part of the ceremony are the countdown (which starts spectacularly and dragged far too long), the ingenious idea of human painting (could do with less distraction of the surrounding floor video), and the recital of confucius's poem (it felt majestic reminding me of the ancient chinese palace with servants calling out commands when the emperors arrive). That's the closest cinematic experience I found in the ceremony. Worst part of the show is the ultra-cliche spaceman (that looks so 70s, and patronising, do they really assume the world still think 'spaceman' represents the future??) and the green man in generic fluorescent suit filled with bulbs which is very meaningless. Oh not to mention the male singer wearing a bloody T-SHIRT singing the Olympic theme song next to a well-dressed Sarah Brightman. God, the very least he can do is tuck in his shirt with a nice belt!!!
  12. To me, the best part of the ceremony are the countdown (which starts spectacularly and dragged far too long), the ingenious idea of human painting (could do with less distraction of the surrounding floor video), and the recital of confucius's poem (it felt majestic reminding me of the ancient chinese palace with servants calling out commands when the emperors arrive). That's the closest cinematic expectation I found in the ceremony. Worst part of the show is the ultra-cliche spaceman (that looks so 70s, and patronising, do they really assume the world still think 'spaceman' represents the future??) and the green man in generic fluorescent suit filled with bulbs which is very meaningless.
  13. Oh and I must say well done to those cheerleader girls during the nation parade!! They had been dancing clapping for 2 hours non stop. They deserve some medal for their effort!
  14. Well I guess Athens made a choice of pleasing 4 billion TV audience than the 90,000 in the stadium. Sounds fair enough.
  15. I really wished I can say I like Beijings ceremony. But Athens' still is the best to me, where it was a truly magical, inspiring and generous ceremony, dedicating it's theme to humanity. The beauty lies in its simplicity which manages to touch so many hearts. It shows how we have evolved as a species, and how ceremonies like this can be conducted in a more humane scale. To me, it changed my perception of how an opening ceremony could be done. And Beijing seemed to take us back to the '80s era style of ceremony, just more lavish and high-tech.
  16. Yes it was good the whole show is very 'Chinese' and no reference to the Athens past. But to me, the whole show doesnt celebrate the Olympics as an event that binds people together. It is purely a propaganda tool to showcase the Chinese culture and history. They forgot to create a joyful, happy atmosphere for the athletes. It all felt very cold and soul-less to me.
  17. Frankly, I was expecting a lot from the Beijing's opening ceremony, and the more you expect the greater disappointment you will get. Perhaps it's the impression that Zhang Yi Mou; with his tasteful elegance and timeless aesthetic of his films will be translated into a live event with cinematic quality. And it didn't. The countdown started with full excitement and grandiosity, but quickly dragged on to become a dull segment of thousand drummers. The very first rhythm is lost and there never seemed to be a high point of the performance (except for the cauldron). It all looks like a military parade with absolute precision. Individual qualities of its people are cast aside and each of them is made to perform like a machine. Intricate and gorgeous costume lost its uniqueness and appeal when 2,008 performers are all identical. No doubt the precision of the formation is admirable, but it took away the soul of the human performer behind it. It is breathtaking and grand yet suffocatingly controlled. The floor/ roof video technology is impressively advanced, but they were overused to tell the story/ filled with images that at some points they became distracting and patronising at times for trying to explain too much. The cauldron lighting is unexpected of course, but felt a bit too similar to Atlanta's. The cauldron lighter seems uncomfortably-hanged and is swallowed by the scale of the video and structure. The running is too long which culminates in an underwhelmed way of lighting the cauldron through a roughly made gutter. But praise must be given to the Chinese for putting together such a well choreographed and disciplined performance. But I was expecting a ceremony which move away from the cliche China and presenting to the world a country is more advanced than we thought. In the end, they want the world to know that one world means one China.
  18. Just something out of topic: I was browsing through a local Borders bookshop here and saw this book, Master of the Ceremonies: An Eventful Life by Ric Birch . Was reading through it on spot a bit and it really provides a fascinating insights on the making of Barcelona's and Sydney's opening ceremony written by the ceremony director, Ric Birch itself. One of the stuff I read is how the unique idea of using the bow and arrow for Barcelona's came about. It was actually an anger thought by the stage designer b4 he left a committee meeting furiously; where they rejected his stage design, as it doesnt allow easy access for the torch bearer to light the cauldron. He left the room and before leaving the door, he turned back and said "Just use a bow and arrow like a Robin Hood" and left. This ingenius spark of idea is how the brilliant cauldron lighting ceremony came about, a beautiful mistake indeed! Other than that, it also revealed the concept of the Sydney's cauldron is a 'frying pan' being lifted up. And how they have to consider risk of audiences throwing bottles and stuff onto the 'waterfall' which might cause the ascending cauldron to stuck. Of course, Birch explained what exactly happened when the cauldron was stucked and how they dealt with it. It is really an interesting book and I would suggest reading it to find out more bout the preparation and execution of olympic ceremonies. (I will go back and get it when I have the money ) But I'm sure you can find it in amazon.
  19. And a big sign that says "Ching Chong Ching Chong to Beijing 2008!" Opps~
  20. That's a bit cliche isnt it? And why is istanbul, india and brazil suddenly came into this discussion?????
  21. P.s What I am suggesting here are ideas that's never done b4, out of the box and stuff that's usually not what ppl would expect in a Beijing Ceremony (e.g thousands of ppl dancing together (which is so chinese!), so instead, no human existence will be shown first for this most populous nation in the world. lol)
  22. Alrighty, since this topic is getting a bit 'uneventful', Im gonna post some of the first thoughts I have when I think about the possible Beijing ceremony. 1) Red covering on the stadium field (yes, it maybe a bit cliche and stereotypical... though i think Athens's water pond is the most beautiful and awe-inspiring element in any olympic ceremony. But probably Beijing can create a unique non-flat centregroud - hill mounds being created in the field, resembling the chinese landscape) 2) A loud Chinese gong will be hit to signify the beginning of the ceremony. (I have another idea of 10 chinese calligraphy master writing the number 10 to 1 in chinese character; using a big brush, on big vertical canvases on each second countdown to the ceremony.. imagine the big brush strokes, the spontaneous characters written on the canvas and the motion involed. Reckon it will be amazing) 3) The opening act - no human and no living things involve. The nature takes its place, like the beginning of earth (is there any chinese legends on this?). Maybe the can create artificial rain, man-made weather... or anything to show the creation of the chinese landscape or history without human existence. Other than that.... its still very much wide open... I cant think of any yet. Love to hear ideas from you guys too!
  23. All games are great. There's no comparison at all.
  24. Anyone knows when will the torch design be revealed? Any guess on how will it look like? I am not really familiar with Chinese crafts and stuff, but probably one guess I would take is it will be based on bamboo cos lotsa Chinese musical instruments are made of bamboo. And bamboo is quite a representation of Chinese culture I believe.
  25. I have yet to see this movie, but a friend of mine who did called it 'The Curse of the Golden Breasts'... Hhmm..
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