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Quaker2001

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Everything posted by Quaker2001

  1. The Village is the big sticking point. I don't know how they get around that one. But they need to figure it out. Yes, it's possible they'll need to reserve alternate housing for people and crowds may be smaller as a result. Although I don't smaller venues are an option.. what's not being used that would be available? I'm confident the next Summer Olympics will be held in Tokyo. I'm guessing 2021 at this point, but who knows
  2. We're setting a new standard for impractical these days as the world tries to figure out how to react to the pandemic. Yes, there are a zillion logistical challenges to figure out that make this near impossible. At this point though, what's the alternative?
  3. There will be a ripple effect, but I doubt anything else on the Olympic calendar will move. Beijing stays where it is (I doubt they'd be so interested in moving to 2023, even though that might make sense). Paris 2024, and everything goes from there. It's other events that might be affected (think the World Athletics championships) that would have to do something with their calendar
  4. Ahhh baron, I do miss telling you how dead wrong you are. So thank you for this opportunity. You are wrong. These are extremely unprecedented times. It is very possible - and I would argue likely - that we could have a Summer Olympics in 2021. The IOC has said cancellation is NOT an option. Postponement is. NBC will not have a major say in this and if they did, they would probably advocate to move it to next Summer, not to push it back by a month. And don't forget there's also the matter of the Paralympics as well
  5. Official statement from the IOC.. HEALTH AND SAFETY PARAMOUNT AS IOC EXECUTIVE BOARD AGREES TO STEP UP SCENARIO-PLANNING FOR THE OLYMPIC GAMES TOKYO 2020
  6. Every Olympics already comes under pressure. 2018 in PyeongChang dealt with political tensions between North Korea and South Korea. 2016 had Zika and the water quality in Rio (both of which were complete non-stories). This is obviously a much bigger issue Tokyo 2020 is dealing with. But that may in fact result in the Tokyo Olympics being postponed. No, that would not create additional pressure for future bids as if all of them have to say "well what if there's another viral pandemic." That's not a reason to think the Olympics have to be held this summer.
  7. According to Wikipedia, it lasted from January 2009 through April 2010. So yes, it did cover the period of the Olympics. I don't think the IOC is equating the 2. Pretty sure they're not completely ignorant of all the sporting events that have been cancelled or postponed. As opposed to swine flu which did no such thing. That's a stretch for anyone to try and tie the 2 together.
  8. That's my guess as well. Moving the Olympics requires the collaboration of the Japanese organizers, all the sport federations and the NOCs. I believe they're working towards making that happen, but they can't say so publicly less someone finds out from the media. It's a ton of moving parts and something that can't and shouldn't be thrown together in a week. I think we all agree that Bach's statements to the media with regard to the Olympics happening on schedule are a little misguided. But I get his point that people shouldn't speculate. So until there's a plan, what else can they do other than say they're proceeding ahead for this summer?
  9. For a while, I had been saying to hold it this Summer and hope for the best. But now, that doesn't seem so advisable. There are many challenges with a move to 2021, but I believe that decision needs to be made in the best interests of everyone involved, difficult as that would be to pull off
  10. Wimbledon can't be moved? Tell that to the folks at Roland Garros who already moved to the fall. If the virus hasn't stopped spreading by June, let's test that theory and see if Wimbledon can't be moved. Let's hope it doesn't come to that. The Earth isn't going to be stuck by a giant meteorite. But it has been struck by a worldwide pandemic. And sports history is being altered before our eyes. The Kentucky Derby has been held every year without interruption since 1875. This year, for the very first time in the history of the event, it's behind held in late Summer rather than in the Spring. If an event like that can be moved, then Wimbledon is certainly not immovable. And neither are the Olympics
  11. USA Swimming calls for Tokyo 2020 postponement
  12. Hell or high water.. but what about a virus? What happens if this virus is still circling the globe at that point. Should the Olympics be held at all costs then? I want the Games to happen as much as anyone, but not if it poses a health risk to everyone attending, which therefore could have repercussions on the rest of the world. That can't happen, as much as we might all want it to. If that has a ripple effect on future events as a result, so be it.
  13. Can they be held in that window, though? It brings up all the questions.. athlete housing, venue availability, volunteers, etc. Can all those functions be brought together to make the Olympics work in the fall
  14. It's not media hysteria. Every country has their own media, so unless they're all working together, that's not the case. It's 4 months until the Olympics, but this is when preparations are in full swing. Those preparations obviously cannot happen as scheduled. It's possible the Olympics can be held this summer. But the IOC needs a contingency plan if they can't be held, because then the only alternative is cancellation, and that's not an acceptable outcome
  15. That should be the least of the concerns at this point
  16. Uh oh, we're officially doomed.. IOC: 100 percent right to keep pressing forward
  17. NBC has insurance, so they're not in the biggest danger here and they're obviously seeing what's happening in the United States, so they're aware of the gravity of the situation. I agree this could have long-lasting damage to the IOC, especially now that athletes are starting to speak out that it's a misguided effort to go all in on having the Olympics this Summer. Especially since there seems to be little thought towards a backup plan. It's like the IOC and the Tokyo OCOG have their heads buried in the sand and they're hoping they'll look up in a couple of months and everything will be fine. I get putting on a face of optimism towards the world, but this situation is out of their control and at the very least, the Olympics will be severely compromised. That doesn't necessarily mean a postponement is the solution and we won't know the answer for awhile, but it's foolish of everyone involved to place a bet on this summer being safe for the Olympics to be held. Maybe they get lucky and the Olympics can provide the break the world will need to help guide us out of this crisis. But I don't know how likely that is to happen. And it could be a historically bad decision for the future of the Olympic movement if they are not prepared.
  18. Who knows. That's the problem is that no one can be sure when this pandemic would let up. And yes, they *should* be working on a contingency plan. But I'm not so confident they're actually doing that. It's one thing to tell the world the Olympics will happen as scheduled. The sense I've had though is they are not even discussing it. That's a dangerous move right now
  19. What baron said. The logistical challenges in moving the Olympics back a year are enormous. That's why they're pushing back against any notion of a postponement. But it's something they need to consider
  20. Some athletes are starting to speak out and I have a feeling it's going to snowball. I'm okay with proceeding in hopes of Tokyo 2020 going off as scheduled, but at some point soon, I think the IOC and the OCOG need to address the possibility that the Olympics may not be able to go off as scheduled this summer and that they're working on a contingency plan
  21. That's issue right there. I get that the IOC wants (and probably needs) to be careful about public statements, but the idea it didn't come up at the meeting is the IOC burying their heads in the sand and keeping their fingers crossed things will get better. I've said for awhile it's either Tokyo 2020 or bust and that moving the date or the location isn't an option. And yes, I think everyone understands that leads to the possibility that the Olympics might not happen at all. At least though everyone involved needs to acknowledge there is a very real chance and there may be no alternative
  22. What the IOC needs to show is that they're willing to choose the sustainable bid over the flashy, shiny new one. They had a chance to do so for 2022 (and let history not forget how close that vote was), but it didn't happen. Chances are, the next 2 Winter Olympic hosts will be Sapporo and Salt Lake. So the next test of that may be a decade from now. And as I've said here more times than I can recall.. the IOC can only choose from cities/countries that propose a bid. I doubt we're ever going to go back to the days when there was a full field of bidders. If the mantra going forward is to reduce or eliminate the number of white elephant stadiums, then how could any country without the majority of the facilities already built hope to be able to put in a sensible bid?
  23. More than a few logistical hurdles. I saw tweets from GB's own Robert Livingstone addressing some of the challenges. Relocation is not the solution.. after all, where in the world isn't affected by the virus at this point. Postponement? Might be too difficult to overcome. Everyone involved would try, but it would likely mean an extremely sized down version of the Olympics to say the very least.
  24. The days of multiple cities competing with each other for the right to host the Olympics are over, possibly forever. So the IOC certainly needs to adapt to that changing climate. But I don't think it's a matter of buying time and hope they atmosphere changes. They need to change unless they want to keep flirting with potential danger. It should be considered encouraging for them, especially on the Winter side, that there are cities and countries interesting in returning as hosts after a relatively short amount of time. Because we're likely not looking at any new frontiers any time in the near future. Right now, we've got Sapporo and Salt Lake showing interest, although perhaps conveniently for the IOC, they're seemingly not after the same prize. So it may not be necessary to use unusual tactics. That Salt Lake is eyeing 2034, I doubt that would change much between now and 2027 when it would be time to announce a host. Locking them in earlier than that may have its advantages, but it need not be like Paris-Los Angeles where it was a 3-way deal for 2024 and 2028. This one can be done independently.
  25. There are definitely some new realities out there. Certainly agree with you on that one. And it's definitely possible that leads to more unorthodox elections of host cities going forward. Still, we do need to treat Paris/LA as a one-off and not necessarily something we should expect to see again. That's not to say the possibility is being completely dismissed, but again, let's not treat it as precedent either as if it's something to be expected again. As an example, look at what the future potentially holds for the Winter Olympics. Originally, it seemed like we might have a Sapporo vs Salt lake showdown. Now however, seems like Salt Lake may set their sights on 2034 instead, leaving Sapporo for 2030. So the dynamics aren't necessarily the same as what we saw with Paris and LA. It's far from unthinkable we could see the IOC award 2030 and 2034 together. But for an organization that doesn't have the most sterling reputation these days, they need to be careful about making closed door deals like that. Different when they had engaged with Paris and LA for nearly 2 years before working out 2024/2028.
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