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mpkwokgsb

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  1. (my apology; pls ignore the other message with my account name as title; my comment did not get italized in the other email) Well, I stopped over in HK this long weekend, and witnessed the torch relay. Seeing it for myself, and now I am back to the hotel checking out what is reported in the media, via quite a number of media around the world. I come across this article in reuters, and wow, comparing to what I actually see, if this reporter can call himself a reporter with impartiality and professionlism, I can only say god bless the mighty freedom of speech. Torch draws mass support and protest By James Pomfret HONG KONG (Reuters) - The Olympic torch was run through Hong Kong on Friday in a festive return to China after a troubled world tour, but tensions flared as patriotic crowds heckled protesters and police briefly detained eight activists. The torch's five-continent journey has been dogged by demonstrations, mostly over China's crackdown against protests in Tibet, which have deeply embarrassed Beijing and provoked retaliatory rallies at home and abroad by patriotic Chinese. Seemingly bowing to international pressure on Tibet, Beijing said last week it would meet envoys of the Dalai Lama, Tibet's spiritual leader. On Friday, the Tibetan government-in-exile, which is based in India, said its officials would arrive in China on Saturday for "informal" talks. China has blamed the exiled Buddhist leader's "clique" for unrest across Lhasa and other Tibetan areas, which it says was aimed at upstaging the Beijing Olympics in August. In Hong Kong, security around the flame was tight, with roads closed, crowds kept at a distance, and at times as many as 16 Chinese torch security guards in blue and white track suits and police on motorcycles alongside the torch bearers. All along the torch's route, tens of thousands of cheering citizens packed sidewalks and strained for a glimpse of the flame as it winded its way across the territory by foot, dragon boat and horseback, as well as by yacht across the city's iconic harbor. Despite the outpouring of support, small bands of demonstrators confined to protest pens along the route demanded Beijing honor its Olympics human rights promises, but were confronted at times by bristling crowds. Continued... Early in the day, torch supporters surrounded and shouted profanities at a small group of demonstrators calling for religious freedom and brandishing a Tibetan flag. Police tried to prevent them from raising the flag and led the eight protesters to a van, along with a Chinese man who'd tried to snatch away their flag. They were later released and told they had been taken away for their own safety. "It was a very dirty trick because I think it was a political decision to remove us 10 minutes before the torch got there," Christina Chan, one of the protesters told Reuters. Comment: This is so factually twisted by this reporter, or this reporter just plain reported selectively. From reading these 3 sentences, an ordinary reader would get the impression that the police did not allow the girl to show the flag at all, and there was no tolerance for other voices in the event. I was there witnessing how this event developed. There was designated protesting area, but this girl did not observe the rule. The police did indeed let her and her fellow protesters wave the flag for at least half an hour they were there, and not until 10 minutes before the relay that they started inflicting responses by marching into the sea of supporters. The police formed the circle around these 4 people all through to protect them. Yes, this action did inflict the response it's meant by the relay supporters, but not only until this 30+ reporters with big cameras and stands, 1 being this reporter of this article I presume, trying to take pictures of them when the crowd start to get out of control. Not only when there was so much pushing among the reporters and some tried to interview this girl that the police took her to a restricted area, and this girl went nuts lying on the floor crying and tried to climb onto an elevated platform when the police grabbed her flag and took her to a van. I am sure this reporter has witnessed all these, and of course he had every right to report however and how much he wants. But if he thinks the reported the whole truth, shame on him. Another lone elderly protester holding a placard urging dialogue between the Chinese government and the Dalai Lama was circled by shouting bystanders who tore his clothing, called him a traitor and said he was "mentally sick". "I was just expressing my opinion. What right do they have to treat me like this? They are uncivilized!" said the man, 72-year-old cab driver Ng Pun-tuk. Comment: I have not seen this incident unfolding, and it's very interesting that there are a lot more silent and peaceful protest without no interruption that this reporter chose not to report. As well, it is very interesting to see how this reporter can report in such an engaged way on the exchanges among the locals, and how he got this idea from a 72year-old Chinese cab driver. SOLEMN HONOUR Authorities in the former British colony have drawn criticism for taking an uncharacteristically tough line including blocking several people from entering the city, among them three pro-Tibet campaigners and a Danish artist and rights activist. comment: Sure, as if it's something uninvented by the democracies during G8/ WTO meetings, and something unique to commie countries "It is a great and solemn honor for Hong Kong, Asia's world city, to welcome back the Olympic flame on behalf of our proud nation," Hong Kong leader Donald Tsang said at the relay's start. A march by a pro-democracy group which holds an annual commemoration for the Tiananmen square crackdown in Beijing in 1989, was shadowed every step of the way by crowds of chanting Olympics supporters who tried to slow their progress. Continued... Elsewhere, Chinese university students waved national flags in front of protesters' banners, and shouted and sang the national anthem to try to drown out the calls for democracy. Comment: Again, that's another cheap association and imposition on others' thoughts, as if the supporters are not tolerant of other people's voice. Interesting he chose to selectively report the fact that there are thousands others at the same time sang the anthems not for the sake of covering other people's voice, and that the blocks around the route were completely jammed and yet these protestors chose to march on the totally packed streets "We are here peacefully to express our ideals that we love China and the motherland," said one, named Yu Xiang. In the United States, conservative and liberal members of Congress joined forces to urge a U.S. government boycott of the opening ceremony of the Games, accusing China of gross human rights violations. After Hong Kong, the torch goes to the Chinese gambling hub Macau and then starts its journey through the mainland. A sister flame is awaiting good weather to summit Mount Everest. Many expect the flame to now have a smooth run on Chinese soil with the possible exception of its Tibet leg in mid-June, leading up to the August 8 opening ceremony in Beijing. (Additional reporting by Alistair Scrutton in New Delhi; Editing by John Ruwitch and Jeremy Laurence) Comment: Again, I maintain my proposition to not take the face value of what you see in the media for your judgement. Do not take it for granted on what you see, and always read with conscious skepticism. While good reporting can promote understanding on the peopls and deeds around you, unprofessional ones would instill and enforce prejudice gaps among people. Again, I am just taking this particular reporting and contrast with my actual experience. Please do not extrapolate anything else and take it too personally.
  2. Well, I stopped over in HK this long weekend, and witnessed the torch relay. Seeing it for myself, and now I am back to the hotel checking out what is reported in the media, via quite a number of media around the world. I come across this article in reuters, and wow, comparing to what I actually see, if this reporter can call himself a reporter with impartiality and professionlism, I can only say god bless the mighty freedom of speech. Torch draws mass support and protest By James Pomfret HONG KONG (Reuters) - The Olympic torch was run through Hong Kong on Friday in a festive return to China after a troubled world tour, but tensions flared as patriotic crowds heckled protesters and police briefly detained eight activists. The torch's five-continent journey has been dogged by demonstrations, mostly over China's crackdown against protests in Tibet, which have deeply embarrassed Beijing and provoked retaliatory rallies at home and abroad by patriotic Chinese. Seemingly bowing to international pressure on Tibet, Beijing said last week it would meet envoys of the Dalai Lama, Tibet's spiritual leader. On Friday, the Tibetan government-in-exile, which is based in India, said its officials would arrive in China on Saturday for "informal" talks. China has blamed the exiled Buddhist leader's "clique" for unrest across Lhasa and other Tibetan areas, which it says was aimed at upstaging the Beijing Olympics in August. In Hong Kong, security around the flame was tight, with roads closed, crowds kept at a distance, and at times as many as 16 Chinese torch security guards in blue and white track suits and police on motorcycles alongside the torch bearers. All along the torch's route, tens of thousands of cheering citizens packed sidewalks and strained for a glimpse of the flame as it winded its way across the territory by foot, dragon boat and horseback, as well as by yacht across the city's iconic harbor. Despite the outpouring of support, small bands of demonstrators confined to protest pens along the route demanded Beijing honor its Olympics human rights promises, but were confronted at times by bristling crowds. Continued... Early in the day, torch supporters surrounded and shouted profanities at a small group of demonstrators calling for religious freedom and brandishing a Tibetan flag. Police tried to prevent them from raising the flag and led the eight protesters to a van, along with a Chinese man who'd tried to snatch away their flag. They were later released and told they had been taken away for their own safety. "It was a very dirty trick because I think it was a political decision to remove us 10 minutes before the torch got there," Christina Chan, one of the protesters told Reuters. Comment: This is so factually twisted by this reporter, or this reporter just plain reported selectively. From reading these 3 sentences, an ordinary reader would get the impression that the police did not allow the girl to show the flag at all, and there was no tolerance for other voices in the event. I was there witnessing how this event developed. There was designated protesting area, but this girl did not observe the rule. The police did indeed let her and her fellow protesters wave the flag for at least half an hour they were there, and not until 10 minutes before the relay that they started inflicting responses by marching into the sea of supporters. The police formed the circle around these 4 people all through to protect them. Yes, this action did inflict the response it's meant by the relay supporters, but not only until this 30+ reporters with big cameras and stands, 1 being this reporter of this article I presume, trying to take pictures of them when the crowd start to get out of control. Not only when there was so much pushing among the reporters and some tried to interview this girl that the police took her to a restricted area, and this girl went nuts lying on the floor crying and tried to climb onto an elevated platform when the police grabbed her flag and took her to a van. I am sure this reporter has witnessed all these, and of course he had every right to report however and how much he wants. But if he thinks the reported the whole truth, shame on him. Another lone elderly protester holding a placard urging dialogue between the Chinese government and the Dalai Lama was circled by shouting bystanders who tore his clothing, called him a traitor and said he was "mentally sick". "I was just expressing my opinion. What right do they have to treat me like this? They are uncivilized!" said the man, 72-year-old cab driver Ng Pun-tuk. I have not seen this incident unfolding, and it's very interesting that there are a lot more silent and peaceful protest without no interruption that this reporter chose not to report. As well, it is very interesting to see how this reporter can report in such an engaged way on the exchanges among the locals, and how he got this idea from a 72year-old Chinese cab driver. SOLEMN HONOUR Authorities in the former British colony have drawn criticism for taking an uncharacteristically tough line including blocking several people from entering the city, among them three pro-Tibet campaigners and a Danish artist and rights activist. Sure, as if it's something uninvented by the democracies during G8/ WTO meetings, and something unique to commie countries "It is a great and solemn honor for Hong Kong, Asia's world city, to welcome back the Olympic flame on behalf of our proud nation," Hong Kong leader Donald Tsang said at the relay's start. A march by a pro-democracy group which holds an annual commemoration for the Tiananmen square crackdown in Beijing in 1989, was shadowed every step of the way by crowds of chanting Olympics supporters who tried to slow their progress. Continued... Elsewhere, Chinese university students waved national flags in front of protesters' banners, and shouted and sang the national anthem to try to drown out the calls for democracy. Again, that's another cheap association and imposition on others' thoughts, as if the supporters are not tolerant of other people's voice. Interesting he chose to selectively report the fact that there are thousands others at the same time sang the anthems not for the sake of covering other people's voice, and that the blocks around the route were completely jammed and yet these protestors chose to march on the totally packed streets "We are here peacefully to express our ideals that we love China and the motherland," said one, named Yu Xiang. In the United States, conservative and liberal members of Congress joined forces to urge a U.S. government boycott of the opening ceremony of the Games, accusing China of gross human rights violations. After Hong Kong, the torch goes to the Chinese gambling hub Macau and then starts its journey through the mainland. A sister flame is awaiting good weather to summit Mount Everest. Many expect the flame to now have a smooth run on Chinese soil with the possible exception of its Tibet leg in mid-June, leading up to the August 8 opening ceremony in Beijing. (Additional reporting by Alistair Scrutton in New Delhi; Editing by John Ruwitch and Jeremy Laurence) Again, I maintain my proposition to not take the face value of what you see in the media for your judgement. Do not take it for granted on what you see, and always read with conscious skepticism. While good reporting can promote understanding on the peopls and deeds around you, unprofessional ones would instill and enforce prejudice gaps among people. Again, I am just taking this particular reporting and contrast with my actual experience. Please do not extrapolate anything else and take it too personally.
  3. This is the long weekend for labour day, and I went to HK for the weekend and did join the torch relay in 1 part and am watching it from the TV now. It was all packed this morning all along the way. Some minor protest for their own cause, and all died out in a sea of red flags. They are doing it on a dragon boat now (accompanied by 8 other boats), and it's amazing to see all the people cheering along both banks. After the dragon boat legs, it will to a horse racetack where there will be 3 legs on horses. The relay will continue the whole afternoon and cross the harbour soon.
  4. If it's a fair question to Maryjane, it's also a fair question to ask a few forummers here if they work for the CIA or one of these anti-Chinese organizations.
  5. It would be nice to see the overall attrition rate in this forum, and how they compare across countries.
  6. No, I just went to China and Hong Kong last week for business, and I can log on from my hotel and the place I worked in. If you referred to an earlier message 2 weeks ago from Xu Wen Ting, he declared already he has been disappointed by some here and would not post any more messages here. Not sure about the other 2.
  7. Hi all, just went for a business trip to China, and picked up this cutie little set of mascot for each sport:
  8. Dear cfm jermie, your point taken and I think it's a valid one . I had not extracted the whole thing, and the point I am taking at is this organization has a history of pushing CIA agendas in the name of freedom of speech. It disguises itself as a civilian organization. It was reported that those individual people protesting for RSF get MONEY based on the airtime and coverage in the media. The more they show up, and the more radical their actions are the more money. That's ludicrous. Again, as what I have been saying all through, there are some people who authentically protest out of their good intentions, and there are some who made the deadline and fan the fire often do. Making judgement for your good heart based on a full set of info of why people/ groups do what they are doing is essential to make a rational judgemnt. Thinking this issue simplicitically may put your good heart in the wrong place.
  9. This is 1, and I stress 1, of the many perspectives one can take on Reports Without Borders. Following are some quotes of 1 of the many possible perspectives on this orgainzation. The topic of the source fo fundings behind it shows up again in French newspaper today.... ".....In a July 6, 2005 statement, Reporters without Borders (RSF) responded to charges related to its obsession with Cuba, its hidden links to the U.S. government and certain multinationals, as well as its relationship with organizations which carry out dubious activities--including some closely linked to international terrorism.1 "....RSF claims with pomp and circumstance that the fact that it receives funding from U.S. foundations--themselves created and funded by Washington-does not prevent it from "denouncing abuses by the U.S. Army against journalists in Iraq." "The organization also published a detailed report about the firing of a tank shell on the Palestine Hotel which cost the lives of two journalists in April of 2003."33 Here Ménard's organization is referring to the premeditated murder of Spanish cameraman José Couso and his Ukranian colleague Taras Protsyuk, perpetrated by U.S. soldiers. What RSF does not say is that the report, published on January 15, 2004, exonerates the US. military of all blame for the crime. ....." "....Contrary to its claims, RSF has never really denounced the abuses committed by military troops in Iraq. It has even implicitly supported the illegal and murderous invasion, saying that "the overthrow of the dictatorship of Saddam Hussein ended 30 years of official propaganda and has opened a new era of freedom, full of hope and uncertainty, for Iraqi journalists." The organization adds that "for the Iraqi media, decades of zero press freedom ended with the bombing of the Ministry of Information on April 9 in Baghdad."35 These words do not come from a Pentagon press release or from the statements of Donald Rumsfeld, but from RSF's 2004 report on Iraq....." I urge some reviewers not to take any offense of any sort personally... I am here providing a source of information on 1 of the many perspectives one can take on, among many others. This info is meant for providing additional info for people in this forum to make an even more well-rounded judgement. It's meant to supplement yoru judgement, not to denouce any of your current judgement.. so please take it easy.
  10. Jesus, this guy just always take every issue so personally to the point of twisting other people's meaning per se .. I quote my original sentence: "...Sure, live in your world of democracies mandated by mankind to liberate the world. Just ask the rest of the 2/3 of the people in the world in South America, Africa, Middle East and Asia what they think of the American, British and French and all the great advanced democrasies, and what they have done to the world in the name of liberating the world in the past 20-30 years, not to mention the earlier even darker period not very long ago in the history of mankind. .." Where did I say people in the people in western countries have to take blame personally for what their ancestors did many years ago... all along in my posting, I keep saying these governments have hidden agendas in the name of democracy and freeing up people like what they did before. It's the same argument some people say they are just targeting at the Chinese regime and not the Chinese people. How many times I said I have all the due respect for those people with all the hearts for good reason, but they probably base their judgement on incomplete info. Please do not put your own words in my mouth.
  11. uhh... what an interesting argument.. 1. I am so glad you do realize the reporters did mention "some of them.." do not mean all of them. This "SOME" is the same "SOME" I used when I said "SOME of the people in the forum...". Why is it when this reporter used the same "some" you take it he did not refer to all, and when I used the same "some", I am making crude generalization. 2. Don't put words in my mouth. First where is the hint in my whole 2 sentences that I said ALL protestors are stupid and don't know where Tibet is. If ever I have to prove ALL of the pro-tibet protestors do not know where Tibet is, you have to prove ALL the people in this forum do not think the way I was saying "some" of them think. "Prove that".
  12. If you want a quick laugh.... sure... based on the logic of some people in this forum, these people must be really the very very exception than the norm... and by all means does not represent the collective intelligence of the protesters, and sure those anti-Tibet separation protestors on the other hand must be brainwashed like they are not intelligent as these people to think on their own. I just love the girl the way she said the second "No"...
  13. Dear sir, I respect yoru point of view, and regarding why history is important. HISTORY IS VERY IMPORTANT IN JUDGING A PERSON'S MOTIVE OF WHY THEY ARE GOING THINGS THEY DO. It's like making friends or making a trading partner, the past credit of what they did, why they did and how they did with their other friends/ trading partner have a lot of do if people trust/ get skeptical of the things they do. Again, like it or not, the West's past credit on what they did to developing nations just make other people (by that I mean not just the west but also the rest of the 2/3 populations of the world) very very skeptical of why they are doing some (I stress, not all though cause there are indeed good deeds the west have done) things they do.
  14. I am so glad there is at least someone here who is open to different views and maintain carry less judicial tone.
  15. Sure, they have done it right in the second world war, and I was talking about what they have done to the rest of the world in South America, Africa, middle east and Asia. I do not have to be explicit in the few words that categorize this period, cause based on experience those few would touch some people's nerves which I have no intention to provoke unnecesary emotions. Regarding human rights improvement, yes there are areas for improvements, but anyone who has a bit of first-hand experience on the developments of China in the past 10 years would have seen changes in not 1 but many aspects in the society that cannot be imaginable 10 year ago (e.g. liberation on labour rights, legal/ judicial system enhancements, social security). Sure, the media is still tightly controlled, but you don't know how many cases these days social issues like corruption, social injustice have been brought up for discussion in the media these days that would never been thought of 10 years ago. Things are changing but i won't blame you or other people f you do not know any of such. On the issue of Tibet, if you still insist it's a human rights issue, like what a lot of people do, then that be it, but I still have a lot of due respect for your pure and saintly belief. Again, history tells us time after time after time that CIA has been behind all these anti-government groups (Taliban used to be one of them but they diverted later) that they used in the names of democracy and human rights to stir up stability and overthrow their enemies . Tibet is just 1 of these many hidden agendas. CIA did a great job promoting Dala and brooming up those Tibetans in exile (or second generations Americans?), and llike I said before, if anyone knows the kind of slavery and aristocracy system Tibet was really like before, I bet he won't be 1/10 as popular as what he is right now. I think China has been reasonable and open in addressing other human rights issue to align with the global standards, like what they have been doing in the last 10 years, but for some issues like the Tibet issue, dress it up how ever one like, it's fundamentally less of a human right issue but more of a sovereighty issue against not a religious group but a hidden force of a darker agenda. You have every right to disagree with me, and I respect that. But like it or not, history tells us many times what the west (or to be fair, largely US and partically US) has done to South America, Africa, Middle East and Asia in the name of democracry is undeniable, and the more fragmented and unstable in another regions other than their own serve their best innterest. Like I said many times, still believing it's a human rights issue show a lot of naiety, though I respect your point of view the way your view is shaped.
  16. Wow.... when people expressed their intelligent pro-tibet opinions in this forum, it reflects the individuality and the freedom of speech, and when I speak out my mind, I am prototyped as brain-washed by the state-controlled media as if I do not have my own individual thinking like you intelligent do. You assume anybody with a different opinion must be living in China what you presume I am. I am sorry, your prejudice and presumption works against the reality. FYI, I live in country in Asia with full access of info from both West and non-West countries (i.e. the other 2/3 of the populations in the world), and probably make judgement based on a fuller set of information than the one you had and the one you though was so free, unbiased and complete. I lived in a western coutnry for 10+ years and have seen how western media not to the point of frabricate, but report selectively, that do the same, if not more, damage to ordinary readers's perception. Sure, live in your world of democracies mandated by mankind to liberate the world. Just ask the rest of the 2/3 of the people in the world in South America, Africa, Middle East and Asia what they think of the American, British and French and all the great advanced democrasies, and what they have done to the world in the name of liberating the world in the past 20-30 years, not to mention the earlier even darker period not very long ago in the history of mankind.
  17. reading some of the replies to Xu, I'd like to express a couple of points: 1. I don't think Xu deed question whether there are different points of view in the Western media. In fact, the given that Western media shoudl presumably share different points of view but when it comes to the issues of CHina they tend to share the same view is very interesting. While one should acknowledge that western media do have stands, depending of their political and geographical/ sub-geographical slants, history tells us when it comes to ideological differences, they tend to become unilateral. The cold war era as recent as in the 80's is a very succinct example. It's not about democractic vs. republican, rich and poor, caucasian vs minority, it's about West and East. What Xu wanted to point out, I think, is in this instance, the major media in most of the western countires happen to exhibit, for 1 reason or the other, an extensive and systematic selective reporting (and in some cases, it's blatant fabrication as in the case of reporting the Nepal police as Chinese police, not in 1, but media in several different countries). Sure the intelligent people like those in this forum presumably would have teh judgement and analytic ability to sip throught the info and make their own judgement. But a judgement is only as good as the quality and completeness of the information that the judgement is based. Well for all, unless you're scholar on Chinese/ Tibetan history, most of the info used in the judgemetn process come from the media, but well if the media systematically report selectively, you might call your judgement sound based onthe info you had, but if te info you have have flaws in the first place, what good is the judgement itself. This sort of unconcience influence would into effect to all people, intelligent or not. 2. Well, another form selective reporting is to glorify a person that might not deserve it. In the west, Dala Lama has been portratyed as close to saint. Thanks to a very great PR program in the last 20 years or so (sure everyone knows where the funding comes from). He always carried this lovely smile and talks about peace, love and sharing. Well how many people know back the sort of religion and society Tibet really was? Back in the 50's (when Dala was inreign and before he exiled to india, well with the support of CIA and UK intelligence of course), the Tibetan society still used a feudal and class system where the monks are at the very top, and there slaves at the bottom of the layers - SLAVES for the religon's sake. (if you're interested, pls go to www.ireport.com and search using "real tibet" and see it yourself. warning thought, some are pretty graphic). Do you know the way Tibetans practice religons? I bet not, cause you, intelligent or not, probably won't have a chance to see it in your media. It's the sort of practices that do not promote production and to some extent physical sacrifices. If placed in a modern developed society, it would have been protoptyed as an extremist religon, like some of those religons in the middle east and some southern US states that the western media prototyped. Again, I am not endorsng on the suppression of religon. All I am saying is, people in the western coutnries, intelligent or not, should not take things for granted for what they see and hear. Just as in any product markeitng, perception can be changed, consciously and sub-consciously, through good PR. I have all the due respect for those people who buy in and fall into Dala's love and peace messages. But they probably have seen 1 side of the whole thing, and there is another ugly side of policitics and ideological tuck of war that ordinary people would have never see.
  18. Dear barrack, Thanks for the very interesting article. here's another article, although very mild compared to the that a media very subtley affect the readers by choosing words that help enforce bias, associating events twisting causal relathipship. Sure, media has freedom of speeach and readers have free flow of info, but influence subject to this kind of reporting is unconcsience and readers get influenced without even knowing it. Again, I am not saying all media are the same, but I have seen the same sort of reporting on this issue in more than a few media. "...A San Francisco police spokesman, Sgt. Neville Gittens, said city authorities debated whether to allow the Chinese guards to participate in the ceremonies planned Wednesday for the torch's only stop in North America. In the end, the guards stayed, but the torch was secretly rerouted to avoid protesters. ..." the reoprter is twsiting the causal relationshipl by linking the fact that the guards stayed and the toch was rerouted.. is that really? "...At the time, the reports said the volunteer policemen were chosen for their height, proportion and good physical condition. The reports also said the young men had received special training in five foreign languages -- learning words such as "back" and "forward" -- and were taught good manners, as well as how to drive cars and motorcycles in convoys along crowd-lined streets. ..." learning words such as "back" and "forward" - is this reporter sure of what he/she. is he/she making it up? First, I doubt this state controlled report would have said this in its report/. Second, by seeing all the different reports in the media, this is really the first time i see this specific mentioning of the specifc phrase they learned. The reporting just make me laugh. "...China's civilian and military authorities have joint command over the People's Armed Police, nearly 700,000 men and women assigned to protect foreign embassies in Beijing along with suppressing riots, controlling the border and fighting fires. ..." sure... the reporter uses a cheap association tactic that instantly demonize these people. It's like a recent incident where an US army raped a 14 year old girl close to a US base in Japan, and then someone can report " this guy is from the US army which invaded and occupied Irag and killed many civilians". PLease, for those people who strongly believe their media are perfect, this kind of reporting on this very single issue are all the same in major medias that I read (or they just copy each other's ideas, which are so apparent considering the flow and for some, wording, are very similar). These examples are just mild compared to the other twsting and uncompleted reporting on other issues. Readers' perception and judgemtn get influenced through these subconscience influences bit by bit, and over time, thorugh many issues, some party and people just get demonized in the eyes of the mass readers. Note: I am not saying China is perfect. All I am saying is the west ordinary people have been perceiving CHina with a rating of D1 and treat is accordingly. If not for these reporting and mass influence, may be China should actually be in state that deserved C+, and should be treated accordingly.
  19. Dear AmaniS, I acknowledge you point of view, and indeed it's slowly happening in the urban centers, where the population is fast ageing, it's a matter of time they would relax the retrictions. However, as in any other urbanization process in any country's development, parents in the cities are finding more and more expensive to raise children, and just as in other developed cities, more and more couples are opting for having no children at all. Eventually, as what other developed populations have or are experiencing ( a very comparible model would be Japan), a policy to encourage birth would soon be necessary.
  20. Hi dear, hello and thanks for your question... I do not live in China and I live in a part of Asia where there is free flow of information, both from China and other parts of the world. I speak Chinese and there are many parts in Asia where there are people whose' native language is Chinese, such as Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan and Malaysia. I cannot say I know a lot about polictics in China, it's just it's closer to my country and I pay more attention to what's happening there, and of course share with people in the forum. nice day.
  21. Dear AmaniS, I have all the due respect to you for your empathy on your husband's Chinese colleagues. Now that you raised the one-child policy that presumably is a crime by the Chinese govt as your biggest gripe, pls allow me to share with you some info that you might not have known, which I do not blame you at all, knowing the evironment that you live in. Has anyone ever questioned why China started this one-child policy? It's not some ramdom policy that the govt had nothing better to do and created it out of their dream. Up until late 1970, China's net population has been growing at 5% every single year. With a base of 800M (i.e. 4 times of US, 12 times of Germany and 20 times of UK), every single year there was the size of more than all of Canada, 2/3 of UK, well a few of California of NEW BORN to feed, to given them medicine/education, to give them shelter and all the basic needs, let alone the higher level needs that some societies are so used to. Back then China had not even gone into industrialization and the GDP was merely a few tens of US$. What was the option? Give them all the human rights to have how many babies they want, and when babies are born, they cannot even be fed/clothed/ have a shelter/ receive any education that a human should deserve, and yeah the whole family of 4-5 or how many you want it just wait and die together? Or limit the population growth for the collective benefit of the whole society. It's always so easy to criticise by the some countries and their people who have been taking so many things for granted in their whole lives, where there are people around other corners of the world who just fight for survival for their very basic needs. I wonder it's in the hands of other govt (or I should say politicians) who have been criticizing on this policy, what they would have done if they need to manage the population of a new Canada every single year at 1/10 of the resources their countries enjoy. Indeed, now that a large part of the population has come out of poverty in the last 20 years, and the overall population has started seeing an ageing trend, the government has lifted up the restriction in parts of the regions. I do not blame you if you do not know it. The point I am getting at is, while resources are not unlimited in a society (which some coutnries and their people would have a hard imagining), there are certain individual rights that one have to forego for the collective benefits of the whole society. Anecdote: AmaniS, I share your empathy when you look at the awe of your husband's Chinese colleagures. When I travel to India and some African nations, seeing all these moms and pas who have had every right to have how many children they want, and seeing the way how these poor children, large and small in 1 single family, are raised, I probably had shared the same, if not more, empathy on these poor people than what you did.
  22. I so agree with you.... an exception here is an exception and does not represent the majority... while an exception somewhere else is always portrayed as a norm. The number of civilians killed in Irag by the allies or the numbers of people killed by the weapons they sold to their friends in the Middle East probably outnumbered the number of political dissidents in China (note: here I am not saying I support China's teatment on political dissident, I condemn it. All I am trying to do is to point out the hypopcrisy of some governments)
  23. I do not agree. The past, present and future are all important. History tells us why people/countries did the things they did, and why they did it shed lights on how people think why they are doing things the way they are today, and what they would do in the future. While I do not agree with all of Xu's points, I do with his point that help explain why a large part of the rest of the world are so skeptical of the motives of the West. Like it or not, it's a piece of history that we just have to live with it in present and the future. Choosing to ignore it in one's thinking and judgement process is equally naive.
  24. I just learned that the man pushing the girl in the wheelchair is actually a blind person.
  25. Whatever. For info for all, pls refer to the singature pic of Maryjane... that's the same girl in wheelchair who this protestor was trying to grab the torch from. Shame on this protestor.
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