Jump to content

Australian Kiwi

Members
  • Posts

    129
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    1

Everything posted by Australian Kiwi

  1. Apologies - above should read: I just did a bit of a Google - most candidate cities that have the unfortunate 'humiliation' of first round elimination do not return. Only exceptions in past 50 years is Istanbul (last for 2000, bidded for 2008). LA 1980 doesn't really count as it was a two horse race.
  2. I just did a bit of a Google - most candidate cities that have the unfortunate 'humiliation' of first elimination do return. Only exceptions in past 50 years is Istanbul (last for 2000, bidded for 2008). LA 1980 doesn't really count as it was a two horse race.
  3. Wasn't Rob saying though that he has moved on from his view that it was a case of American-exceptionalism? That aside I certainly do agree that it probably wasn't - and was simply more a case of terrible optics and poor "bedside manner" in the way it was announced. If an Australian city exited like that it would have caused uproar. I have no doubt that if by some strange quirk of voting patterns in first round of voting in 2005 resulted in "having obtained the least number of votes... the city of London has been eliminated" would have caused serious uproar among the British and I don't think they would be have returned for another shot anytime soon.
  4. This is an excellent point. The IOC loved the spectacle of those big, widely televised announcements and the drama they would create. I think perhaps a good starting point might have been to keeping the voting process quieter and less like a national election. Make it a closed session. No final pitches. From candidates - they're not there. Only pre-recorded videos and bid books. Just IOC members. Don't reveal eliminations in drips and drabs ("the city of ... has been eliminated" - awful). Simply announce the elected city via press release with the final results. A month or so later the IOC executive can travel to the elected host city to sign contracts and celebrate without rubbing the other cities noses in it. Perhaps offer the unsuccessful candidates automatic (conditional) qualification for shortlisting for the next Olympiad (this would work in the IOC's favour more than theirs and could provide some structure to the "continuous dialogue"). Waive applicant fees, etc, to entice them to stick with it. Chicago's experience was a case in point of poor optics. Instead it could have been: Rio de Janeiro elected host of 2016 Olympic Games. In recognition of the worthy bids from Madrid, Tokyo and Chicago, the IOC hopes they will accept our offer of continuous dialogue over the coming four years towards electing the host of the 2020 Olympics. Of course - other cities could join Madrid, Tokyo, and Chicago but perhaps members could be encouraged to value persistence.
  5. This approach absolutely sucks - and its truly surprising that the IOC can't see the reputational risk of dragging candidates along like that. That diagram is so high level and vague. It will certainly backfire when they use this approach to appoint a more contentious host - such as Russia or China. Brisbane slid under the radar because its a relatively unremarkable decision to return to safe hands Australia - but I can see this really closing out interest from new frontiers entirely and will create a fair amount of heat of the choice of host is contentious (such as Moscow or Shanghai). I think as soon as interest picks up again they'll be back to voting. Coates got what he wanted.
  6. Canterbury-Bankstown is part of Western Sydney. You can bet Dunc Grey (the 2000 Olympic velodrome) would be the 2026 venue.
  7. Yes, it is part of Greater Sydney. However, this is a big urban area (now pushing 6 million+ people over a very large area) and has several different regions. 'Western Sydney' comprises about 2 million people - includes Sydney Olympic Park itself- and doesn't include the Harbour and famous icons of Sydney. Its a geopolitical entity... perhaps think of Greater Los Angeles Metroplex vs City of Los Angeles... you could compare Western Sydney to Long Beach or San Bernardino in that sense. Mississauga in Toronto is another example.
  8. I wouldn't count on that. While I do think that the 2000 Olympic venues (and Olympic Park generally) would play a pivotal role in a Sydney-region Commonwealth Games Stadium Australia is in a permanent rectangular arrangement since the Olympics and a track couldn't fit. I could see it hosting the Ceremonies - and perhaps T&F taking place at the nearby Olympic Park Athletics Centre (15,000 permanent capacity - could be expanded for a Commonwealth Games?) You can see Stadium Australia in the background (top right) of the pic below...
  9. Agree . Resting on its laurels some have said (although I don't necessarily agree - its changed a lot since the Olympics). 2032 could have been Sydney's.
  10. As I mentioned in the other thread... looks like Australia is likely to step in for 2026 with talks underway with the NSW State Govt (I understand likely reviving 'Western Sydney 2026' centred upon Homebush, Parramatta and Blacktown - the push is from these councils). Makes sense - the region has some great infrastructure (even post-2000) and is getting a new international airport. It is in some ways a distinctly different flavour of Sydney than the more famous eastern side (even though the 2000 Olympic Park is technically in WS). I understand from a reliable source that the Victorian Government was also quietly engaged earlier and considered a 'diluted' 2006 model was considered that would have not used the MCG (I suspect Track and Field at Albert Park - ceremonies at Rod Laver?). Eventually landed on a No from Melbourne. SA Govt also said No last year to an Adelaide hosting. Keen to see whether this NSW idea gets up - Western Sydney could be interesting and different to Melbourne and Gold Coast (and as the article says a good boost towards the 2032 Olympics).
  11. https://www.theaustralian.com.au/sport/olympics/tokyo-olympics-2021-which-australian-sports-are-set-for-funding-boost/news-story/340c8d9ef26153489d6c171ac599594c
  12. Article below - looks like Australia is likely to step for 2026 with talks underway with the NSW State Govt (likely 'Western Sydney 2026' centred upon Homebush, Parramatta and Blacktown). Makes sense - the region has some great infrastructure (even post-2000) and is getting a new international airport. It is in some ways a distinctly different flavour of Sydney than the more famous eastern side (even though the 2000 Olympic Park is technically in WS). I understand that the Victorian Government was engaged earlier this year but decided it was not a priority in our COVID recovery. I have it from a reliable source that a 'diluted' 2006 model was considered that might not have even included the MCG at all (I suspect Track and Field at Albert Park - ceremonies at Rod Laver?). Eventually landed on a No from us. SA also said No last year to an Adelaide hosting. Keen to see whether this NSW idea gets up - Western Sydney could be interesting and different to Melbourne and Gold Coast (and as the article says a good boost towards the 2032 Olympics). https://www.theaustralian.com.au/sport/olympics/tokyo-olympics-2021-which-australian-sports-are-set-for-funding-boost/news-story/340c8d9ef26153489d6c171ac599594c
  13. Possibly? But its more the intent and the thought that counts. Japan did the Olympic Movement a huge favour by pushing through and committing to delivering the Games in the most exceptional and challenging circumstances (when they probably should have been cancelled). Instead, a certain VP was too busy stitching things up for his own home town for it to have been properly considered. If the IOC is so intent on sustainability - surely repeat hosts would be part of that which mostly utilise existing venues (eg. a third Tokyo Olympics in 2032 instead of Brisbane).
  14. This is why I am baffled that the IOC didn't instead consider offering 2032 to Tokyo - even if 2021 went ahead as is at least give them a chance to host again soon to do it the way it was intended.
  15. Agree - but haven't enjoyed any prior. Sydney's in Atlanta sucked, as did Athens in Sydney, Beijing in Athens, etc...
  16. I actually think a cross over segment with footage in the next host works better than some tokenistic presentation in the Closing of another city (I can't think of a good one). I loved tonight's 2024 handover. It was optimistic, bold, and happy. Tokyo's ceremonies feel rather cold and I think this would have been the case regardless of COVID.
  17. I might be alone but I loved Atlanta’s opening, it had so much energy, colour and heart.
  18. Yes - imagine if 2020 was happening in Rio (wand no disrespect to Brazilians) or any other ‘less organised’ host. Could have been a disaster.
  19. Yep - precisely. I understand that Tokyo had constraints with the wooden roof - but they didn't even place it to the side like London. Really disappointing and takes away some of the atmosphere that elevates the Olympics above an IAAF or Commonwealth Games. For all that the IOC carries on about protocol it seems like a really obvious oversight.
  20. I don't disagree - but you can't tell me that if Toronto had stepped up with a serious counter offer to host 2032 that the IOC would have turned it down because of LA 2028.
  21. Well, thats an internal problem. I was meaning more about the fact that Toronto's 1996 bid was asking for a third Canadian Olympics within 20 years. Seemed like a lot. Amazes me to see all these cities so eager over and over with bad timing. Where were Toronto and Madrid when Brisbane was being fussed over for 2032? I bet if the IOC proactively engaged with them early (instead of Brisbane with a Coates tip off to go in hard) they would have been interested and frankly one of them would have won, probably Madrid.
  22. I was too young to remember, but didn't Toronto 1996 get undermined by the fact it was a mere 20 years after the not-so-successful Montreal? Not to mention Calgary? At least Australia was proposing a respectful 40 years even with a previous host city.
  23. Agree - one thing I do hope that Brisbane hosting does is make smaller cities believe that they can attain it again. For example, I think Brisbane's win would have been noted by the likes of Manchester who could still very well host its long awaited Olympics in the coming decades. Some of the most iconic Olympics have occurred when the IOC took the circus to the lesser known - Antwerp, Helsinki, Melbourne, Munich, Seoul, Barcelona, Atlanta.... were all "backwaters" by comparison in their day. These cities pride themselves of their Olympic heritage. Happy to be rebutted but I am not convinced that the Olympics leaves as much of a mark on the likes of Paris, London or Tokyo.
×
×
  • Create New...