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anthonyliberatori

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Everything posted by anthonyliberatori

  1. Yes. I will be staying with some family friends in Yokohama while I'm in Japan, and they are huge gymnastics fans, and they are struggling to get some tickets. I invited them into the Facebook group so hopefully they can find some there and something works out.
  2. I am one of those fans itching to see the USWNT! Been a lifetime supporter. I currently have one women's football ticket in Yokohama, which is where I will be staying for the Olympics, but I'm looking to buy more. I will keep any ticket that has the USWNT attached to it, but I would also like to see teams like Japan, the Netherlands or England depending on who they're playing. Football has been harder for me to come across, especially the lower-tier seats, so I think you're right in that regard. Lots of locals and tourists are grabbing football tickets as overflow tickets, just to make sure they get to see something. I feel you there though. I would kill for a women's gymnastics ticket but that would burn through my budget. I would also want to see men's basketball, because after the US's embarrassment without the NBA stars when every other country had theirs, it's clear that the game is getting tougher, so I would like to see the American men work a bit for a win. I'm also a big volleyball fan, got two tickets already. The aquatics venue does look fabulous though, and I'm glad you were able to secure something in it! Not sure what country you're from but hopefully you even get to see your own country.
  3. Funny you bring this up, considering it was Australia who just granted their women's team equal pay, not their men's team. And while many on the USWNT do enjoy and thrive off of the attention they receive, they most certainly earn their platform. It's not like they get loads of attention for walking away with nothing .... they've won half of all women's world cups ever. Come in 2nd or 3rd at the other half. If I knew I was a part of a dynasty like that, hell I would be loud too. Further, in terms of attendance in France, it should be noted that particular countries filled the stadium each and every time they played. The USA (who actually had more people at its group game in the Parc Des Princes vs Chile than the French did on their opening night), The Netherlands, Japan and Brazil packed all of, or nearly every, stadium they played in, and all of these teams have qualified for the Olympics (not USA yet, but cmon). You can guarantee that these large fanbases will show up and support their teams. While the attendance will certainly be low at some games, especially considering many games will not be in Tokyo, I wouldn't rule out the growth of women's football worldwide. This women's World Cup was viewed by over 1 billion people, and many traditional soccer nations like Spain, Argentina and Italy have begun to invest a hefty sum of money into the game and their domestic leagues, and they are seeing growth in its following. I would not be surprised if the average attendance is higher in Paris 2024 than this past World Cup, because by then, the women's game will continue to grow. With ticket prices, also consider that certain teams that are known to have large fanbases, like the aforementioned ones, did not see tickets that low. The USA's cheapest group stage game started at around $45, and it just went up more and more. We aren't even at playoffs yet, which you had to buy without knowing the teams, but once the USA was released as the opponent, ticket prices went into the three digits. So, it goes to show that if certain teams were able to pack a stadium with heightened prices, they'll likely do it again for the same team a year later. Many of the $10 games featured teams like Jamaica, New Zealand, Cameroon, etc. But, if I am wrong come the summer, you can personally come back and tell me, but I expect to see walls of orange and flying USA flags all about women's soccer venues in Tokyo.
  4. That's what I keep saying. Wish it was bigger, especially now after seeing the demand in Japan be so high, but I'm glad for the new stadium which will enhance the ceremonies and experience. The old stadium or the one in Yokohama would've held Japan back technologically, which is where we all want them to thrive because that's what they're known for. Regardless, I'm still very excited for the ceremonies.
  5. Welcome to Gamesbids, love your positivity! To be fair, the women's tournament has no restrictions, The same USWNT that just won the World Cup, as well as Lionesses, Dutch women, and Swedish women that had a shot, will go at it again (minus 5 players given the decrease in roster space). The Olympic tournament can be just as exciting as the WWC, because the matches are very tight from the beginning, given that there are only 12 teams. Further, given that it's in Japan, a country that loves their women's team, any game against Japan will have an insane atmosphere. As for the men, it can be a good view into the future. I know countries like Italy, the USA (if they qualify), Romania, Egypt, etc will be excited to see the future state of their teams, given that their current teams have been disappointments. I know as an American, the U23 roster we could produce would include all of the "stars" we talk about in the American soccer community (Pulisic, McKennie, Adams, Weah, Soto, etc), so should the USA qualify, I know it would be highly anticipated. Obviously a country like France is not going to care all too much about the state of their U23, because their senior team just won the World Cup and have a good shot at Euros right before the Olympics.
  6. I am very excited for Tokyo 2020! Not only will this be my first-ever Olympics, it will be my first time to Japan, so I have a lot to be excited for. I am going to be staying at a family friend's house in Yokohama, so I'm happy to have her help me navigate the area, and enjoy local Japanese culture. I am going to Japan alone, and I'm pretty young, so I'm hoping to meet others in my situation and maybe make some lifelong friends to travel to the Games with for a while. I think that's what I'm most excited for: the Fan Zones and opportunities to meet new people. Question, what is typical of Olympic Fan Zone culture? Is there usually something like pin trading to help bring people together? How are the locations of the zones distributed? I'm hoping to meet people from both the US but also many other countries, so I'm hoping they're diverse and it's easy to communicate. Also hoping for a women's football ticket, but I'll take what I can get
  7. What about Paris? Paris bid for 2008 and 2012, plus 2024 obviously ... Paris was bound to host an Olympics sometime between 2008-2030. Further, an Olympics in London was also inevitable IMO ... having gone since 1948 without an Olympic Games and 1966 since a FIFA World Cup ... the Brits were craving hosting rights to an event, especially as their empire and colonial rule started to die down and they would want to prove themselves to the world. London and Paris were almost sure to host before 2030, I don't think an argument without at least one, but either of them, has much substance.
  8. I booked mine a month ago. I paid $590 with a student discount, so it would've been like $650-$680 if I didn't have that. Happy I booked when I did!
  9. I am trying JAL for Tokyo! I am very excited to be trying it as well. I usually do look for flights in incognito. I would recommend you do the same, especially when you're just browsing different prices and not exactly set on something specific. I found my cheap flights on JAL/Americans from PHL in an incognito window.
  10. That's what I was thinking .... better than London 2012. Still feel like there's something missing with it, I'm not sure what, but it just feels a little bland. Oh well, London's logo was fugly and Rio's was not ... obviously had no bearing on their subsequent legacies.
  11. Oh the concern isn't attraction, the USA tried for Olympics like 2012 in New York and 2016 in Chicago and just didn't get them. But all I'm saying is the long length may finally be coming to a close, which is good, because anyone born 1992 and later (like me) likely has no recollection of a Team-USA-At-Home world event. I wonder if the lack of the ability to space out hosting events has to do with American culture. Back in the 80s with the Cold War, the USA was in cultural competition with the USSr and working to maintain its cultural dominance. I wonder if the USA wanting to go back to hosting all of these events could have something to do with us feeling the need to defend our global image in some regard. It's fair to say that the IOC just wanted a break from the USA, and they're just now coming back to it, or that the IOC is in financial trouble and needs an economically viable Olympics to save its image and it trusts the USA the most to do that, but I wonder if 2026-2028-2030 could have some sort of cultural ties to them.
  12. Whoops - didn't see there was a second page on this forum so I didn't see that the conversation switched, sorry to change the topic!
  13. Now that you mention it, I kind of like the idea of Lyon as well. It was a great host city for the 2019 WWC Semi Finals and Final, so it would be great to see the city host the ceremonies and indoor events, with the alpine events further out from the city. But I'm gonna have to go with SLC or even Denver for 2030 - least problematic, could rake in loads of money, and the IOC may not want to lean Central Europe after immediately doing that. Wonder if at any point someone will step up and say that a 2026 World Cup, 2028 Summer Olympics, and 2030 Winter Olympics is too much for the USA. I feel like it won't happen, because the USA hasn't played host to a major world tournament since the 2003 Women's World Cup, so an entire generation hasn't been able to cheer on Team USA at home, but 2028/30 are far from now - who knows what the political and social situation of the USA will be.
  14. After all the destruction Nagano just faced with the typhoon, I'm not sure they are going to volunteer themselves to welcome the world. They have other things to worry about right now. I would've loved that though, to see all of Japan's former Olympic host cities working together to help Tokyo.
  15. Found roundtrips for you that are $1,000 on the dot. Not a bad option to be honest, you'd fly out on the 28th from Ontario to Taipei, change plane (3 hour layover, which will be good to clear the likely-long immigration line and find your next gate in that massive airport), and then onto Narita. Same route on the return on August 4. All on China Airlines. The website Skyscanner is going to send you through might go away depending on how fast you see this message, but the airline itself is charging $1039, so not an extreme jump. https://www.skyscanner.com/transport/flights/ont/tyoa/200728/200804/?adults=1&children=0&adultsv2=1&childrenv2=&infants=0&cabinclass=economy&rtn=1&preferdirects=false&outboundaltsenabled=false&inboundaltsenabled=false&ref=home#/details/15040-2007280040--32444-1-14788-2007291315|14788-2008041430--32444-1-15040-2008041810 Also, if you're willing to drive to LAX, you could fly roundtrip for $789 through Manila ... it would end up being less, I know cheap parking can be found for LAX at some of the nearby hotels. Same deal, just through Philippine Airlines and through Manila. Not sure if you'd be open to the LAX option, but I'll attach it either way https://www.skyscanner.com/transport/flights/lax/tyoa/200728/200804/?adults=1&children=0&adultsv2=1&childrenv2=&infants=0&cabinclass=economy&rtn=1&preferdirects=false&outboundaltsenabled=false&inboundaltsenabled=false&ref=home#/details/13416-2007282355--31964-1-14788-2007302010|12234-2008040115--31964-1-13416-2008041000 You can also catch a direct flight on Singapore Airlines from LAX to NRT for $913. Singapore has the best economy class in the world in my opinion, and I would do anything to fly it again. This is another great option if you're up for the drive to LAX, plus it's direct, so a lot more ease. https://www.skyscanner.com/transport/flights/lax/tyoa/200728/200804/?adults=1&children=0&adultsv2=1&childrenv2=&infants=0&cabinclass=economy&rtn=1&preferdirects=false&outboundaltsenabled=false&inboundaltsenabled=false&ref=home#/details/13416-2007281530--31876-0-14788-2007291900|14788-2008041900--31876-0-13416-2008041310 I know you didn't ask for the LAX options, but I just thought I'd share them from my personal experience. I was looking at flights from one of the DC airports to Tokyo and they were all between $1200-$1400 total, regardless of number of connections or time. Then, I got curious and checked the flights from PHL, a 2 hour drive from me, and I ended up paying $585 roundtrip to fly PHL-JFK-HND ... Spoiler, they would've been $680 had it not been for the student discount I was given (I'm a university student), but still ... very happy with that choice, so I figured I would test the luck and pass it onto you.
  16. This is true, but I'm not too sure the building of these arenas in Milan is necessarily a bad thing. Milan has 3.6 million people, so there is a population there to uphold the venues. Italy won 3 golds at Pyeongchang after 0 in Sochi, and support for their ice hockey team has grown out of IIHF Worlds. While it may not be directly what the IOC wants in terms of arena recycling, it's not like Milan (and its metro area in North Italy, where the country's money is) will leave these venues empty. Vancouver was able to upkeep their venues and it's a much smaller city. Granted, Canada has a larger emphasis on the winter sports, but Italy also has other strong sports like Volleyball that could keep these small arenas functioning. However, I would also be okay with the incorporation of Turin. The IOC's goal should not be glitz, glamour, and new arenas. It should be getting host cities back and redefining what it means to host a sustainable Olympics. We will see what route Milan goes with this, but you are right in that including Turin would've been the responsible choice.
  17. I have done this, LOL. It's not unheard of to fly into the major regional international airport for the region and then take a train or rent a car and drive to the slopes. Cortina is about 4 hours by car from Malpensa, just as Vail is about 2 hours from Denver Intl Airport, and Whistler is 3 hours from YVR. Granted, there are closer, smaller airports, but it's not unheard of to take the direct flight to the major airport and drive. More so of what I was going for was that international ski tourism should increase for Italy. From an American perspective, France, Switzerland and Austria are the usual go-tos for Euro skiing, as they're the most well-connected by air routes and popular with the Brits, so we can speak English. Not that the Olympics have been known to turn every host city into a lasting premier destination, but maybe now Italian skiing will cross the mind of more international tourists. You're right, Cortina may be hard to get to, but maybe that will land more tourists at other Italian ski towns.
  18. I know this point was asked not to be brought up again, and they aren't technically bidding, but damn, I'd really be much more behind this if it were Melbourne. They haven't had the Games in the television era so it really would be new to many, and by 2032, most of the people who watched Melbourne 1956 would be dead or very very old. It's about time this city comes back to the limelight. Plus, they have many of the venues not only already built, but already in use, and not to mention the necessary infrastructure and population boom to keep the facilities in use. The argument that Brisbane 2032 would "bring good things to Australia" could be applied to Melbourne, and given Melbourne's experience with hosting the Games (and many other international competitions) before, I'm really wondering why Melbourne was not the frontrunner. Does anyone know why Brisbane was chosen over Melbourne? Was it because it was the next big Australian city to lose its hosting virginity? Or were the people just not about it? I truly want to know, because if angry taxpayers in Brisbane will be a deterrent to 2032, I'm wondering how it'll fare in Melbourne, as not only is the city and its metro area of a completely different political mindset, but taxpayer dollars would go to things such as expanded highways, public transportation, and housing over massive sports venues, which more people would probably be able to get behind because then the citizens too can feel the positive effects of the Games. Can anyone actually explain to me why Melbourne wasn't selected? I was not following the Aussie bid close enough because I guess I didn't think it would get too far.
  19. Great choice. Hopefully the increased train service to Cortina become a regular thing so Italy can capitalize on the skiing business during the season for years to come. That makes it very easy for tourists to fly into MXP, a major airport, and then take the train right to Cortina. Ensures longevity with tourism. Ultimately, this was the right choice. Stockholm/Are/Latvia was not in favor of the people and opened up a marketing nightmare we all know the IOC did not want to have to deal with if they didn't have to. Milan/Cortina's "two cluster" approach is very similar to those of Vancouver, Sochi and Pyeongchang, which I personally think is an good way to utilize existing infrastructure from an urban area, develop a smaller winter resort town nearby, and hope a tourism business sticks. Also, the support in Italy is immense, and the proximity to nearby countries ensures full venues for events like speed skating (the dutch), curling (the swedes), downhill skiing (Germans, Austrians, French, and the Italians themselves), and Ice Hockey (Germans, Swedes, Finns, and even the Italians since it's growing so much). Really a win to get back to the Alps and as long as all goes well, we should see cities like Calgary, Sapporo, and even Salt Lake coming back eager to host - which would make the IOC elated.
  20. I am a believer of omens, and in the span of 24 hours, my: Tokyo 2020 volunteer application was denied My cousin, who married a first-generation American whose parents are from Japan, arrived back from Japan after visiting her cousins-in-law (best way to put it) My cousin told one of the Japanese cousins-in-law that I am an Olympic history nerd and she offered me a room in her home in Yokohama I stumbled upon $670 roundtrip flights to Tokyo from Philadelphia. So.... I"M GOING! My first ever Olympics! I could not be more excited! Thanks to everyone who gave me ticket advice, as of right now I still have no tickets. I will continue to check CoSport and the Facebook group, and hopefully something good comes up. But, the hardest part is out of the way, and I am going. Now I am definitely paying attention to this thread on tickets
  21. This was very good advice, it is definitely something I'm going to think long and hard about. I really really really want to go, and I have the money for it, so I may be ready to take that leap of faith. Any advice on how to start trying to find those tickets though other than just checking CoSport on and off, day in and day out? I tried to find some hockey tickets last night, but they were also sold. Football will be nice too - the US Women's team will certainly be there, but the men are making a good push as well to go. I would certainly love to go to as many events as possible. However, you made a good point about "Olympic Spirit". It would be so nice to meet other fans from around the globe at different Fan Zones, and maybe even do some pin exchanging. that's something I hadn't thought much about. Plus, I've never even been to Japan, so I would want to do some sightseeing as well. So I would be okay (elated actually) if I went, saw some events, hopefully most involving Team USA, and still got to experience that Olympic Spirit and what Tokyo has to offer.
  22. While I am an Olympic nerd, I am trying to go to Tokyo 2020, which will be my first ever Olympics. I put in an order request through CoSport (American) and naturally didn't get it, and the sports are still all sold out. But after reading through this thread, I'm getting the impression that some tickets may open up later? And that I shouldn't be too concerned about landing tickets? Or should I take the post a few above mine as completely serious, with me being "doomed"? Also, if you do say I have a chance of landing tickets. what do I do in regards to accommodations and flights? Should I start trying to book a place to stay now, and flights in 3-5 months, and just chance the tickets? Or should I wait until I've secured some tickets to book accommodations? Would any of your recommend booking refundable accommodations in this case? Sorry for so many questions, again, this would be my first ever Olympics ... I'm really interested in the Opening Ceremony, Basketball, and both gendered Volleyball, Hockey, Football (Soccer), Swimming, and Beach Volleyball, Men's Handball, and Women's Gymnastics. If I can get a few tickets to any of those events, I would be elated
  23. Draw: https://www.fifa.com/womensworldcup/final-draw/ Group Stage Match Schedule: https://www.fifa.com/womensworldcup/matches/
  24. Draw just finished up in Paris and these are the groups: Group A (Games in Paris, Reims, Rennes, Grenoble, and Nice): France South Korea Norway Nigeria Group B (Games in Le Havre, Rennes, Valenciennes, Paris, and Montpellier): Germany China Spain South Africa Croup C (Games in Valenciennes, Grenoble, Montpellier, and Reims): Australia Italy Brazil Jamaica Group D (Games in Nice, Paris, Rennes, and Le Havre): England Scotland Argentina Japan Group E (Games in Montpellier, Le Havre, Valenciennes, Grenoble and Reims): Canada Cameroon New Zealand Netherlands Group F (Games in Le Havre, Paris, Rennes, Reims, and Nice): United States Thailand Chile Sweden
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