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CITYofDREAMS

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Posts posted by CITYofDREAMS

  1. 18 minutes ago, Quaker2001 said:

    Why are they growing angry?  Gee, could it be because they're a bunch of spineless jellyfish who are being called out for being spineless jellyfish?  And we supposed to care that the IOC is angry because they'd rather ignore this issue than deal with it?  And maybe the United States should back off the investigation less it hurt their 2024 bid?  No thank you.

    totally agree with you... however is just unfortunate that they will use this against the US bid and we will have another Chicago 2016 scenario here.

  2. 1 minute ago, Quaker2001 said:

    Wait, what?  Please tell me you're not advocating for allowing drug cheats to compete in the Olympics so that all these investigations won't harm LA's bid.  Which is debatable to say the least.

    No I'm not advocating for cheaters to play but going by the IOC reaction with the investigation it would seem they don't have any problems with allowing this to happen otherwise why are they growing angry over the investigation.

     

     

     

  3. GARCETTI: TRUMP PRESIDENCY COULD HURT LA'S 2024 OLYMPIC BID

    unday, August 07, 2016 12:12AM
    RIO DE JANEIRO --
    Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti acknowledged Saturday that the results of November's U.S. presidential election could weigh heavily on his city's chances of hosting the 2024 Olympics, saying that a victory by Donald Trump could turn off IOC voters.

    In an exclusive interview with The Associated Press, Garcetti also said Los Angeles could offer "the last best hope" for the United States to host the Summer Olympics again before the American people begin "tuning out" from the games.
     

    Garcetti, a 45-year-old Democrat and supporter of Hillary Clinton, is in Brazil to observe the Rio de Janeiro Games and pitch his city's bid to members of the International Olympic Committee. One of the main topics of conversation with IOC delegates has been the U.S. election - and the prospects of a Trump presidency.

    "I think for some of the IOC members they would say, 'Wait a second, can we go to a country like that, where we've heard things that we take offense to?'" Garcetti said. "But I think that gives us even more urgency globally, where we can say, 'This is something that is a different strength maybe than the things that you've heard or the things you believe.' I think we continue no matter what the outcome of the election is."

    A new U.S. president will be in office when the IOC selects the 2024 host city in September 2017. Los Angeles, which hosted the Olympics in 1932 and 1984, is competing with Paris, Rome and Budapest, Hungary.

    "Everything that we're going through right now in the United States politically, I don't want us to be a country that turns into itself," said Garcetti, who spoke at the Democratic convention in Philadelphia last month. "I think we have to look outward to the world."

    The IOC's 98 members come from all over the world, and Trump's comments on Mexicans, Muslims and other issues won't encourage them to vote for a U.S. city.

    "They wonder, 'Is America going to take this strange turn?'" Garcetti said. "Were there to be an election result that is less international, more inward-focused, maybe there's even greater urgency to a bid like this.

    "But even if that doesn't happen, even the threat of that, the talk of that, the idea that we exclude people based on who they are at our borders, gives us urgency to having things like the Olympics underscore who we are and what we're about."

    Los Angeles bid chairman Casey Wasserman said the city will continue to push the bid on its own technical merits.

    "I don't think you can judge a country by who runs for president," he said. "I think you should judge a country on who is the president and their beliefs and their policies. And clearly that's something the members will take into account. But that's something I can't control."

    Los Angeles is seeking to bring the Summer Olympics back to the U.S. for the first time since Atlanta hosted the 1996 Games. The bid follows failed attempts by New York and Chicago for the 2012 and 2016 Olympics, respectively.

    "I don't know if this is the last best hope, but I do think that after a few bids, after a while, there will be real feeling of people tuning out in America, a new generation that isn't connected with the legacy sports," said Garcetti, who attended Rio's opening ceremony on Friday night, 32 years after going to the close of the '84 Games as a 13-year-old.

    Recent American bids have suffered from anti-U.S. sentiment among some members in the European-dominated IOC, and Garcetti said he is working to change that.

    "There may be a general anti-Americanism but once you create a relationship with somebody, it becomes a relationship with Eric and that person," he said. "As we get to know each other over time, they realize you can't slap a title, just like 'American' and a caricature of what that means on anybody."

    "I want to listen," Garcetti said. "I don't want to just come in and say, 'We're the Americans, we get the most medals, we bring in the sponsorships. That turns people off."

    He acknowledged there could be a backlash among some IOC members to what they consider U.S. meddling in global sports affairs, including the Justice Department investigation of world soccer body FIFA and the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency's call for a total ban on Russia's Olympic team over state-sponsored doping.

    "I've been very careful to say, 'Look, what prosecutors or anti-doping officials do, at least in our country, is completely separate from what a mayor or a city government is about. We're not involved at all."

    On other issues, Garcetti:

    - encouraged Rome to remain in the 2024 race despite current opposition from new mayor Virginia Raggi, who says the city has bigger priorities at the moment. Garcetti said he has been in touch with Raggi's office to urge Rome to stay in.

    "You can fix your problems first, but that doesn't mean you have to exclude great opportunities like the Olympics," he said.

    - embraced the five new sports approved by the IOC for the 2020 Tokyo Games - baseball/softball, surfing, skateboarding, karate and sport climbing. While they have been added for Tokyo only, Garcetti said he would hope they could also be included in Los Angeles.

    "Skateboarding and surfing, those are synonymous with LA," he said. "If we're lucky enough to win, I would absolutely see us continuing those sports."

    - confirmed that the new NFL stadium being built for the Los Angeles Rams would be used for the Olympics if the city wins the bid. Rams owner Stan Kroenke is helping to build a new $2.6 billion retractable roof stadium in Inglewood, California, scheduled to be completed in 2019.

    The new stadium could be considered for hosting the opening and closing ceremonies. The Coliseum would host the track and field competition.

    "We've not yet defined how we'll use the stadium but we're very excited to use the stadium," Garcetti said. "Stand by, but we're talking with the Rams, Stan Kroenke, about the best way."
  4. From left, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, IOC President Thomas Bach, and LA 2024 Chairman Casey Wasserman address Los Angeles' bid with the media in the spring.

     

    LA 2024 gears up for its Olympic campaign season

    oastsm-b88761357z.120160723200008000gk1h

    From left, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, IOC President Thomas Bach, and LA 2024 Chairman Casey Wasserman address Los Angeles' bid with the media in the spring

     

    Consider it the Brazil primary. Or the Rio caucus.

    When the Olympic Games open in Rio de Janeiro next month, more than 10,000 athletes from 206 countries will be joined by members of bid committees from Los Angeles, Paris, Rome and Budapest. For them, the Games are the first major step in campaigns aimed at winning a different golden prize in another South American city 15 months from now – the right to host the 2024 Olympic Games.

    The days leading up to and continuing through the Rio Games mark the first time that representatives from the bid cities will have access to all the International Olympic Committee members and other influential officials with international sports federations and national Olympic committees since the cities formally launched their bids last year.

    “Rio is incredibly important,” said Danny Koblin, chief bid officer for LA 2024, the local bid committee. “It is going to be one of the first opportunities where all of the membership will be in the same place at the same time.

    “This is a bit of our coming-out party.”

    Rio is so important that LA 2024 is sending its entire 25-person staff to Brazil.

    Each bid committee can place eight individuals in the IOC’s observer program, where officials will get an inside look at venues, transportation and other areas of operations during the Games. LA 2024 also will have a 20-square meter display area within USA House, the USOC’s hospitality headquarters at an exclusive private school overlooking Ipanema beach, where bid officials will be able to inform visitors on their campaign.

    Mainly the emphasis will be on the old-fashioned retail politics of pressing the flesh and making connections.

    “It’s all about the socializing, who you’re meeting with, what kind of message appearance you make, what kind of message are you sending,” said Robert Livingstone, founder and senior editor at the Toronto-based GamesBids.com. “The whole trip is about marketing the message to the stakeholders who are going to vote on the bid.”

    Those stakeholders are the bid cities’ target audience in Rio – the 90 IOC members who will vote on the 2024 host city Sept. 15, 2017 in Lima and the 2,000-plus international federation and national Olympic committee officials who could be influential in the bid campaign. In hotel hallways and lobbies, over drinks and at Olympic venues, LA 2024 officials hope to renew or build relationships with those IOC members and power brokers. They will be promoting a $75 million bid-specific campaign based on months of research, polling and questioning influential international sports figures and designed to convince those 90 voters on awarding Los Angeles a third Olympic Games.

    “That’s something that typically you have to work hard on the front end of any new Olympic bid because it’s easy to confuse a city campaign with the city’s Olympic bid campaign,” said Terrence Burns, LA 2024’s chief marketing officer. “This isn’t Randy Newman’s ‘I Love L.A.’ or the L.A. Convention Visitor’s Bureau new campaign. This is a very specific objective against a very specific target audience. Our organization is the bid committee for Los Angeles’ attempt to host the Olympic Games in 2024.

    “We’re not trying to drive investment in the city. We’re not trying to lure tourism to the city. We’re not trying to do anything other than win the Olympic and Paralympic Games. Therefore our messaging is precisely about that and it’s targeting toward the Olympic family, these 2,500 people or whatever it is that will eventually boil down to a hundred people pushing (the voting) buttons.”

    LA 2024 officials said that brand addresses a major IOC concern – connecting with the millennials, in particular the so-called “Generation Z.”

    “It’s important to Thomas Bach,” Livingstone said, referring to the IOC president. “A major part of his (presidential) election campaign was getting in touch with the younger generation.”

    Toward that end, the Rome bid committee recently launched a new technology campaign and Paris officials are promoting a youth program. But with the IOC at what Burns termed “an inflection point,” LA 2024 officials said with the city’s proximity to the heart of the entertainment industry and cutting edge technology companies both in Southern California and Silicon Valley, the Los Angeles bid is uniquely positioned to help guide the IOC into the 21st Century.

    “Our tag line is ‘follow the sun’ and we chose it pretty deliberately,” said Burns, who has been involved in successful bids with Beijing, Vancouver, Sochi and PyeongChang. “It has a literal meaning, obviously, because of the geography and climate of California. It’s very evocative and people around the world gravitate toward that. But it’s also a metaphor for the future. It means that we want to serve the Olympic movement really by helping them create a new Games for a new era because we are in a new era. We’re in a new Olympic era. We’re in an era of sustainability and frugality and prudence and all of those things. ...

    “We think the confluence of the media assets, the entertainment assets, the technology assets that we have in California and we do expand LA 2024, expand it’s definition to include California to connect the IOC and the movement to the global millennial audience, which is an audience that is a bit out of touch with the Olympic Games and the Olympic movement. We think California has the assets to do that. That’s the first (point).

    Burns also said because of the abundance of world-class venues, LA 2024 “can offer the IOC, frankly, we believe the most sustainable and minimal Games in history.”

    “At the end of the day,” he added, “what we’re trying to offer is a glimpse into the future and we’d love to serve the Olympic movement by helping them create a model that would be sustainable for the next hundred years.”

    Burns and Koblin, a former senior vice president with the Wasserman Group, stress that their mission in Rio is as much about listening to IOC members and others in the Olympic movement as to pitch their bid.

    “I want to make sure it’s clear that we’re not parachuting in, pretending that we know what the problems are and all the answers are,” said Burns, who previously worked for Meridian Management, the IOC’s sponsorship agency. “If we’re honored enough to host the Games, we think we’ll have a transformative Games, but we know that we’ll do that in conjunction and partnership with the movement. We have to include them obviously in helping them re-imagine their own product.

    “Our connection to youth and culture and fashion and trends is undeniable and has been for the last 60 years. Since consumerism took off in post-war America, California has been at the forefront of that. So we have an existing conversation with young people around the world, it’s not an Olympic conversation but we don’t believe it will be hard to engage them in an Olympic conversation because we already have the tools to do it.”

    So how would LA 2024 officials use those tools to engage the Snapchat generation?

    “I think you have to talk to them where they’re talking, number one, and that’s usually not on network television,” Burns said. NBC’s Olympic programming is “spectacular and it reaches hundreds of millions of households etc. We’re talking about between now and when we have opening ceremonies, so the next seven, eight years if we host the Games, those years we have an opportunity to engage young people around the world on technological platforms that were developed in California, things that aren’t even here yet, we can’t even imagine, another Snapchat in three or four years, whatever that’s going to be. We’re adept at using those technologies, we’re adept at creating content that appeals to that set of people, the millennial generation, and we’ve proven it.

    “So I think for us to take the Olympic properties, the Olympic intellectual properties, the Games, Olympism, the ideals, the values and somehow adapt a campaign, storytelling around that toward those people, again in the context of the technology that they use is not a far stretch because it’s not happening right now.”

    But first LA 2024 officials must convince the IOC and do so by walking a fine line between informing an aging and not always technology-savvy IOC membership without appearing condescending. It is a process that begins in Rio.

    “Number one, you don’t do that with a press release,” Burns said. “You don’t do that with one presentation in Lima. We have 15 or 16 months here to build a communication campaign that will culminate in Lima around (the bid’s core points of emphasis). So we’re going to have to show them, not tell them, and we have some tactical plans around our communications planning going forward with the bid that I think will be illustrative of what value we can bring to the Olympic movement, to this particular target audience.

    “And I don’t mean to insinuate that we have to appeal to millennials and no one else in order reinvigorate the OG, but let’s be honest, the millennials of today are the future decision-makers of 10, 20, 30 years from now who may be running companies who will be supporting the Games or not so the opportunity is to engage them not only as fans but as real participants and lifelong evangelists for us, for the movement.

    “That’s something that I think we can do. And L.A. is known for it. In this particular race California, the West Coast of the United States, is a crucible of innovation, technology and entertainment and we’re going to bring that to the surface of the Olympic movement.”

    http://www.ocregister.com/articles/olympic-723462-bid-games.html

  5. Those sneaky little Persians, it's very rude that they wouldn't notify LA officials they were coming and have a bit of lunch or something.

    The woman from the French consulate who was repeatedly filmed wining and complaining about being filmed looked like a fool who was hiding something. and then she walk to and put her hand over the camera lens saying "what are you doing".....like some slimy politician. It's not a big deal but they were acting like they knew they were doing something wrong.

    While it appears there is no rule violated by the French, on its website the International Olympic Committee states,

    "The cities must refrain from any act or comment likely to tarnish the image of a rival city or be prejudicial to it. So far no further comment the French Consulate or the bid committee."

    It's interesting too that the rest of the tour was canceled once they were caught... while I take this as compliment, makes wonder what is driving this. Making sure that their proposed venues are equal or better, maybe???

  6. Well then, either your imagination sucks, or you have a terrible understanding of New York and history. I assume its a mix of both.

    LA now is nothing like New York of the 1920's and never will be, nor will LA ever reach the culture and development of great global cities like New York, LA, Paris, Berlin, Moscow, Sydney, etc. Plain and simple, LA is not that great...San Francisco will always be better.

    LA is only good for the Olympics and Hollywood.

    So, is it LA great or not? re-read your post.

  7. The USOC polling a mere 600 city residents hardly constitutes as "full support". Especially when all was asked in the poll was a simple, generic - "would you like L.A. to host the Olympic Games in 2024". All that is, is a simple yes or no question without getting into any fundamentals of the whole process.

    FYI do you know what kind of polling the other bidding cities did? Were they more thorough than the polling the USOC did for LA? Do the NOCs have to follow certain polling guidelines established by the IOC?

  8. Well, in case you haven't noticed, that was certainly one of several factors that worked against the last two U.S. Summer bids.

    L.A. ran an effective & successful Games without any national financial backing & made a "profit" BACK in 1984. Those Games had a cost of a mere $584 million. That's chump change in comparison to the BILLIONS (& more likely tens of Billions by the time 2024 rolls around) that an Olympic Games really costs nowadays.

    There is no way in the world that L.A. could replicate the success of 1984 so easily in 2024. And all the rhetoric that is said otherwise by some out there on the subject is basically a fallacy & only talking nostalgically on the matter.

    Well, in case you haven't noticed, that was certainly one of several factors that worked against the last two U.S. Summer bids.

    L.A. ran an effective & successful Games without any national financial backing & made a "profit" BACK in 1984. Those Games had a cost of a mere $584 million. That's chump change in comparison to the BILLIONS (& more likely tens of Billions by the time 2024 rolls around) that an Olympic Games really costs nowadays.

    There is no way in the world that L.A. could replicate the success of 1984 so easily in 2024. And all the rhetoric that is said otherwise by some out there on the subject is basically a fallacy & only talking nostalgically on the matter.

    And LA being able to produce a game in 1984 at $584 million with the profit was admirable since Montreal 1976 left the city bankrupt and with over one billion $ in debt. Wouldn't you consider that creative?

    LA is not talking about $584 million budget. It would be ridiculous to even think that. The LA bid its over 4 billion dollars. What make you think that LA can't replicate its previous successes? Who had said it would easy to replicate?

  9. Perhaps they shouldn't happen, but there are problems with major staffing and property development schemes all the time.

    Rio has labored through its own issues, and Japan is currently struggling with a labor shortage which will affect the cost of Olympic venues. http://asia.nikkei.com/Politics-Economy/Economy/Labor-shortage-threatens-Japan-s-construction-projects

    The problem for Los Angeles is that they don't have the national government as a fall back if anything goes wrong. If it encounters a major crisis Los Angeles could become another Denver, whereas Paris would likely be able to soldier on through public debt.

    It is the major reason there is a revolt in democratic countries. And that's why I think people in LA will react negatively if it eventually becomes clear that hosting means spending $4-5 billion in taxpayer money.

    I agree that LA will probably find private financing for the major projects. But it isn't certain that they will.

    No American city will have the a national financial backing for that matter... and if this is a decisive factor in who will be granted the Olympics, then all US cities would be out of this process.

    LA has proven that can run an effective and successful games without any national financial backing and make profit. This actually only forces American cities to be much more creative than their counterparts that require heavily financial backing from their governments.

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