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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/08/22 in Posts

  1. They have Salt Lake. The IOC will pay the USOPC whatever sum of money is needed to satisfy them if it comes to that. And yes, Sapporo seems like they're doing exactly what the IOC wants them to do. Keep up the facade that the majority of their citizens want the Olympics and doing very little to contradict that line of thinking. That's where the "new norm" allows the IOC and the folks in Sapporo to be much more discreet about this.
    2 points
  2. As a democracy lover, no, as an olympics fan, yes. Again, olympics are "discreet" propaganda for the host country, so of couse people wouldnt wanna spend billions in a fortnight event, au contraire of countries like russia, china or the US, where the reputation of the country to the world is the 1st priority. So if the only way we can get olympics in free countries is through private surveys, let them be. Is strange that people in this site support the blown off of the bids, while that is exactly what would represent the end of the olympics as we know them.
    1 point
  3. Yes, referendums have killed some bids. I know this may be hard to believe, but that's a good thing. If a bid can't survive a referendum, then maybe that city shouldn't be bidding for the Olympics. And again, in case you forgot someone who is in favor of them in order to more properly and effectively screen candidates.. Coates to Bid Cities: Vote, Then We'll Talk Whose interests are you advocating for here? Is it the IOC or the cities who are bidding and their citizens who should have a stronger voice than a straw poll that may or may not represent the cities' will. The Sapporo poll says 52 percent are in favor and you think that's satisfactory? Hope you're not looking to advise cities if you're going to leave it at that and not dig any further. You know what city had similar support? Boston when they were bidding for the 2024 Olympics and had been selected as the USOC's bid candidate over Los Angeles. Easy to forget that was a thing. Then they ran more surveys and found out that support levels were dropped. So the USOC pulled the plug and wisely went to Los Angeles to put them forward. Going off of 1 poll showing public support is not enough, especially when that support level is barely over 50%. What happens if the IOC awards Sapporo the 2030 games and support level drops. Would you still argue that awarding them an Olympics was a "success" because the bid wasn't given an opportunity to fail? That goes directly to Rols' point about accountability. And if the IOC continues down that path, it may not be long before their already shaky reputation takes another hit. The goal should be to find the right candidate cities/countries. Not to lower the standards by which to elect those cities and make it possible for them to skate through without the necessarily public scrutiny. Because when that happens, the wrong city or country could slip through. Ask FIFA how that's working out for them where we're about to have a November/December World Cup in Qatar
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  4. When will employment opportunities open up for Victoria 2026? I would love to get a job working on the Commonwealth Games!!
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  5. I agree. This 2026 model may well set up a model of feasibility for African nations such as Kenya, South Africa, and Nigeria (for example, others may also be considered) would bid to host by spreading events across different cities or regions thus not leaving individual cities such as Lagos, Durban or Mombasa solely carrying the legacy of large built stadiums or expense. It opens the door to the possibility of a West Indian Games with events shared between the Commonwealth countries located in the West Indies including Jamaica, Belize, Guyana, Trinidad and Tobago. It opens the door to the possibility of New Zealand hosting either a North Island or perhaps a South Island games. Or perhaps even New Guinea leading a Polynesian and Melanesian games. It will be studied with great interest no doubt by many of the Commonwealth nations who will now see a door opened to them.
    1 point
  6. Well, the Extraordinary Event clause failed (by 6 votes) yesterday at the ISU Congress, however the ISU Council's decision to ban RUS/BLR skaters, judges, etc does remain in effect as the Congress approved all of the ISU Council's Communications issued since the last Congress in 2018. In other news, the age minimum increase was passed, overwhelmingly. I'm convinced that the Valieva doping scandal led to the passage of the proposal, though it was in the works for quite some time prior to the Olympics. On tap for 6/8 and 6/9 are separate sessions for the Figure Skating (includes Synchro) and Speed Skating (includes Short-Track) branches, with lots of technical rule proposals, especially on the FS side. Elections for the Technical Committees in each branch will be 6/9; then on Friday, the entire Congress comes back together to vote on a few tabled motions as well as hold elections. Notably, Alexander Lakernik of Russia will not be able to stand for re-election as FS VP since the Congress rejected the motion to allow ISU Officials to serve past the age of 80.
    1 point
  7. Constantly in awe of AustralianFan's natural ability to contort logical reasoning. They would make a great press secretary for North Korea or Russia (aka Special Military Operation).
    1 point
  8. This is a pretty intriguing games format, seeing genuinely smaller cities hosting together - it's almost like a dry run for the Olympics in Queensland. I know I tend to rail against the alternation of UK and Australia at hosting but I can see Wales or even Northern Ireland looking at this with interest. Still wish Singapore or NZ had put their hand up though, much as Australia will be great hosts again.
    1 point
  9. It's Ballarat versus Nagambie for the rowing in the Commonwealth Games as the city makes its pitch to host THE battle lines are drawn as both Ballarat and Nagambie fight it out to host rowing at the 2026 Commonwealth Games. The City of Ballarat has put its hand up to host the sport, launching its bold bid to host it alongside confirmed sports athletics and boxing. But there's a lot of water to go under the bridge, with two major obstacles in its way. Firstly, a decision as to whether the sport will even be included in the Commonwealth Games - which would make it the first such time since 1986 - has yet to be taken, and secondly, the small problem of Victoria's other 2km course at Lake Nagambie, which recently hosted the Australian Championships. Strathbogie Shire has also declared it is keen to host the Commonwealth Games should the decision be taken to include the sport for 2026. On Ballarat's side, it recently hosted the hugely successful Australian Masters Rowing Championships held last month and an opportunity to host would celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Olympic Games in 1956. The City of Ballarat says Lake Wendouree is the ideal venue for one of the world's biggest sports with its proximity to accommodation, hospitality and other Commonwealth Games events, including the blue ribbon athletics, making it the ultimate home for the sport. Ballarat mayor Daniel Moloney said the host nation had the right to add an optional three to five additional sports to the Commonwealth Games calendar of events. He believes rowing is a perfect fit for Victoria 2026. "There is an incredible and cost-effective opportunity to include rowing at the Victoria 2026 Commonwealth Games using Lake Wendouree as a venue," he said. "Major investment in the last decade means Lake Wendouree is a world-class, event-ready venue." Australia secured two rowing gold medals at the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games against 79 nations, 54 of which will be eligible to participate in 2026. Ballarat mayor Daniel Moloney is ready to welcome the world to Lake Wendouree. Picture: City of Ballarat Lake Nagambie recently hosted the Australian Championships which saw Ballarat Clarendon College crew take out the national schoolgirls title. The region near Euroa and Shepparton has so far been snubbed in early announcements surrounding the regional Victoria games. Strathbogie mayor Laura Binks said it was advocating to the state government to firstly include rowing as a sport in the games and then commit to hosting it at the Nagambie Lakes Regatta Centre. "Although rowing is an optional Commonwealth Games sport - it is one of Australia's oldest and most successful sports and we believe the Nagambie Lakes Regatta Centre provides the perfect place to feature this event," Cr Binks said. "The international popularity and interest in rowing, and the 2026 Commonwealth Games in Victoria, provides an opportunity to bring rowing back to the international spotlight in the spectacular and inspiring setting of the Nagambie Lakes Regatta Centre. The Nagambie Lakes Regatta Centre is a 2km rowing course with eight buoyed lanes. It's a fully fenced, secure venue that has infrastructure excellence like no other location across the state." Lake Nagambie has hosted major events including the Australian championships this year. The City of Ballarat's bid has won plenty of backing, however. Five-time Olympian and triple Olympic medallist Anthony Edwards said Ballarat would be a logical place for the regatta. "I hold that piece of water very high on my list," Mr Edwards said. "I think Ballarat is an ideal place. Lake Wendouree is an amazing venue, the work that has been done in the past 20 years is incredible." Mr Edwards said giving many developing countries in the sport such as Sri Lanka, Pakistan and others could only strengthen it going forward. "I always remember watching the Edinburgh Games (in 1986) but I had myself an opportunity to compete at Commonwealth Regatta at London Ontario," he said. "That was a proper Commonwealth Games competition which aligned before the world championships. It was a great event, there was a nice atmosphere and was very well supported. Anyone from any country can win in the single scull. Rowing has over the past 20 years shown huge growth particularly with the emergence in Asian countries. What a great opportunity it would be for the development of the sport if those developing countries got to compete in an event like the Commonwealth Games? And Ballarat, it's an iconic place, it has an Olympic history, it's such a unique rowing course. It's a wonderful spot." 1984 Olympic silver medallist Gary Gullock said having recently competed in the Masters event on Lake Wendouree, there could be no better advertisement for the sport. Ballarat mayor Daniel Moloney is ready to welcome the world to Lake Wendouree. Picture: City of Ballarat Lake Nagambie has hosted major events including the Australian championships this year. Ballarat is a picture perfect setting for rowing at the Commonwealth Games. "It's absolutely fantastic, even on a not-so-perfect day it's a great course, accommodation is nearby which is definitely a plus over Nagambie, were it is always difficult to find somewhere to stay. You have a big city right on the doorstep, it's been dredged, so it's consistent depth all the way." Masters rower Donald Gibb said Ballarat held many advantages over Lake Nagambie, but cautioned work would need to be undertaken to get the course up to international level. "You've got all the accommodation options and restaurant support, you've got close proximity to Melbourne, and you've got a great facility at the finish of the race for pontoons and viewing," Mr Gibb said. "There is nothing quite to match it anywhere in Australia where you are so close to the finish." Mr Gibb said any issues in Ballarat could easily be fixed. "I rowed recently in Copenhagen, it was also a more open course, and they actually brought up floating platforms (to stop the wind), similar to what Melbourne did on the Yarra in the 2006 Commonwealth Games and it made a huge difference. Congratulations on the city for having a go, it would be great to see Ballarat take on more major national, regional and school events." Committee for Ballarat chief executive Michael Poulton said Ballarat would be a perfect host. "Definitely feasible, it would be a fantastic 'get' if we were able to get that event," he said. "Should rowing be adopted we have a great capacity to run a really strong rowing event in this city. Clearly the competition is Nagambie, but having the other sports here already makes it a very attractive option, we can leverage the opportunity to have athletes and officials staying in the one city." Rowing Victoria chief executive Ian Jickell said discussions were ongoing as to whether the sport would be included with a decision expected "within quarter three of this year. The discussions are between the state, the Commonwealth Games committee and Rowing Australia and we are supporting Rowing Australia," he said. "Our key aim is to get rowing included in the games. We're incredibly fortunate to have two venues which are both strong candidates to host a traditional regatta. If ... included, we would expect a venue decision before the end of the year."
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  10. They keep the seagulls from crapping on the poor buggers in the cheaps seats
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  11. Indeed, but they should keep their powder dry (pun intended) and wait and see what's announced later this year. It's not as if other countries were falling over themselves to host, so they get what the host nation decides.
    1 point
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