Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/06/22 in all areas

  1. I felt we needed this thread to organize our opinions regarding what we saw last night. So i'll start with mine which will be a very long one: 1) Countdown It seemed a bit strange at first, but I thought the countdown and the usage of the Lunar New Year/Spring Festival theme was very cleverly made. The film was obviously directed by Yimou due to his known style and I liked the minimal feel, although somewhat reminiscing of Sochi 2014 countdown (also pretty long) with the cyrilic alphabet. What left me deeply confused is if this video was seen through the massive LED screen they built for this opening ceremony, or in the small screens at the tribunes. 2) Opening sequence -Dandelion I thought this segment was very gentle...a huge contrast to the massive drum mass performance we saw back in 2008, and a much peaceful and open approach to the viewers, with a good combination of the large glowing sticks and the LED screen working in synchrony. I could tell Zhang Yimou did this part as the performers were very well coordinated with the movements. Music in this segment was also very good but, sadly, it was the only trace of chinese music we saw in this opening ceremony. I'll write more details about it later on. 3) Entrance of the National Flag The idea of ethnicities and normal civilians helping carry the flag in a long line as a symbol of togetherness seems at first like a very emotional message. However, when you consider the regime which is currently running China at this moment, you can't help but feel this is a propaganda message to give a false sense of happiness and togetherness when it is a fact some of those ethnicities have been constantly critical of how the Han (the majority ethnicity in China) have treated them, specially over the last years. I felt it was also kinda copied directly from 2008, which also had ethnicities carrying the flag though in a different way. The kid with the trumpet solo was very reminiscing of Maynard Fergusson in Montreal 1976 closing...i had no complaints with the song used, although I know its context is that it was a song composed for a movie which was in pro of Chinese intervention during the Korean War, so my first thoughts were about south koreans probably being very bothered about it, despite it being a very popular song in China. No comments about the performance of the chinese anthem. I'm aware their laws regarding arrangements of the anthem are very strict so i did not expected anything special from it. 4) Olympic rings segment In a way, this was my favorite part of the ceremony. At first, I had a hard time realizing if the large Ice Block which came from underground was just another projection when it was actually a large prop. The projections of the previous editions and winter disciplines over the ice block was a very good use of the LED screen technology, which was a vast improvement over the projections seen in other ceremonies. Then, we have a retun of the hockey guys from the 2018 handover....breaking the large iceblock which melts into the Olympic rings. A very well done effect, even if they took many elements from the 2018 handover. And it was the first in a long time I felt the Wow factor returned to an Olympic ceremony. The rings floating in the middle of the air were very reminiscing once more of 2008, and also of Torino's due to the fact the athletes entered under them. 5) Parade of Nations After the athletes, the main protagonist of this segment was the LED screen once again, with beautiful ice patterns which formed the way on which the athletes of the world marched in. However, I couldn't help but feel it was very similar to Sochi's parade of nations, which had a very similar structure and execution. There were, however, two things I did not liked much of this segment in particular. The music. In most parade of nations you hear the music of the host country (Pyeongchang and Kpop, London and british pop music, etc) so its an opportunity to showcase it. Here instead, we had a potpourri of classical western songs, which felt somewhat uninspired and a wasted opportunity of not using songs from the actual host nation (and yeah, I know Ode to Motherland was used at the end, but I still feel it was not good enough and its still a March song heavily inspired by western music). The screen, besides the large walkway, also shown beautiful landscapes of China. While this was nice and everything, I believe it would had been more fitting if they shown landscapes of the country which was marching in, instead of just having landscapes of China showing while western music, completely unrelated to said landscapes, was playing in the background. Another big wasted opportunity in my honest opinion. Lima 2019 was a good example of what i'm commenting, which shown popular landmarks of the marching countries project into the large mountain structure. The snowflake placards was a nice idea although obviously difficult for the bearers to carry. The outfits of the placard bearers were alright, with nice references to Lunar New Year costumes, although I personally prefered the Ice Fairies from Pyeongchang as they felt more classy. 6) Snowflake - Part 1 Again, wonderful and clever use of the LED screen, with the placard bearer girls putting the snowflakes in the ground and the screen giving the sensation they were being transported at fast speed to the center of the stage, to form the large snowflake prop. And from here onwards is where, sadly, the Opening Ceremony takes not just a downhill path, but a nosedive in all forms. 7) Speeches I thought I would be more annoyed at Xi Jinping during the speeches but, as expected, it seems no one told Bach in his childhood to shut the **** up. Its very obvious he loves the spotlight and people listening to our beloved Olympic Champion in Fencing, 1976. Seeing being so complacient and servile when he tried to speak in chinese was honestly a very pathetic move (I don't remember him doing this in previous speeches....Samaranch kind of did it but at least he did it with all of the hosts)...it reminded me of John Cena and his poor attempt at speaking chinese when he tried to apoligize for his comments regarding Taiwan. I honestly couldn't tell if Xi poker face when opening the games was just him being neutral or annoyed at Bach constant butt kissing. 8) Faster - Higher - Stronger - Together Didn't thought much of the performers dressed as average citizens walking and forming photos of people doing everyday stuff. I thought it was also somewhat copied from the 2018 handover, with all the photos coming out from the letters those creepy pandas collected from all over China. Imagine.....what can I say of this song and its overuse which hasn't been said already by all of us. Bach obviously has a fetishism for this song and how he's obviously forcing every host to bring it up. I wrote a nice post in another thread about why I think Imagine is a bad song and it should be excluded from every event, not just the Olympics: The whole segment was also, if you analyze it, a huge ripoff of Zhang's handover in 2018. The same skaters drawing the same patterns from the 2018 handover, too. An unnecesary figure of a ski jumping guy which ultimately served no actual purpose as I was mostly distracted seeing what was happening in the floor (Sochi did the floating figures much better), all while this cringefest of a song was playing in the background. 9) Entrance of the Olympic flag As if we didn't had enough with Imagine, this ceremony features the return of an old dreaded song we tought it was gone forever (thank god) from ceremonies...Ode to Joy. The waving effects of the Olympic Motto as the flag carriers marched in wasn't a bad effect, that's for sure, but Ode to Joy is also another song which wasn't needed to come back to an opening ceremony in the current year and century. The Olympic Anthem....very catastrophic performance. A chorus should never be dancing when performing any anthem, it feels super cringe and disrespectful, at least to me. In 2008 we saw a very well worked performance of the Olympic Anthem in almost perfect greek. Here, I had a hard time telling if they were singing Greek or not, due to the heavy chinese accents. Also, you can tell they were struggling heavily when they had to sing high notes. Anyway...so far, the worst performance of the anthem i've seen, it made me change my opinion toward Rio 2016 version (which back then I thought it was pretty bad too) to a more positive one. 10) Snowflake - Part 2 Extremely tacky and cheesy performance, again, with the same dances we saw during the singing of the Olympic Anthem. The only real highlight was (supossedly as their media tell us) the fact the interactive screen reacted to the steps of the little children, though I have a hard time believing if that's actually even true. Not much opinions about this segment. I just thought it was overall very forgettable and, if you removed it from the ceremony, not much people would had noticed any difference. 11) Olympic Flame / Snowflake - Part 3 I won't lie, the torch design of Beijing 2022 was very nice. I thought it was a good modern renditionof the scroll we saw in Beijing 2008. However this beautiful design was wasted due to Covid restrictions and a government which is too chicken **** to criticism and still suffers of PTSD after the heavily protest marred relay of 2008, which led us to the shortest and most irrelevant torch relay in recent memory. But that wasn't even the worst part. Zhang (although honestly I think this is something Bach and Balich are forcing to almost every host) came up with the idea of a more simple cauldron which would reflect the times we live in. He also said he felt very nervous about how our reactions would be to it. And oh boy, I can see why he was so nervous. They decided that the cauldron, instead of a large new structure, would be the torch itself, sitting inside the large snowflake which was the common element connecting most of the ceremony. A very small flame which you can barely even see from a distance, and which protagonism and importance it had at every Olympics has been completely stolen by a a large, floating prop, heavily distracting and minimalizing the Olympic flame itself. An idea which, on paper, sound interesting, but when actually executed, its actually awful. All of this while, once again, we had to hear that awful tacky song, and all the performers circling and worshiping the huge floating Snowflake in a segment which reminded me of old sport ceremonies held on communist countries. A huge, massive dissapointment. I would had rather preferred they reused the 2008 cauldron as a symbolism to the fact Beijing is the first city to host both Summer and Winter games instead of this. It would had been, although lazy, much better than whatever the devil was that. Final veredict: 6/10 A very hit and miss ceremony. I wanted to be a bit merciful and not rate it as bad as Tokyo's since I still feel that, despite everything, it was a tiny bit better. But it was still a poor ceremony desperately pretending to be good and impressive, when it really wasn't. It is very obvious to me most of the budget for this Opening Ceremony was completely wasted in that gigantic LED screen.... While I admit the effects were very well made, . Sadly, I feel both projections and use of technology are making people more and more lazy with doing more clever and better planned ceremonies. Take off the LED screen from this ceremony, for example, and only leave the rest. What you would have is a very subparceremony, almost on par with how Tokyo was. The lesson learnt yesterday was that having supossedly advanced technology at disposal is not an absolute warranty a ceremony will be good if the ones in charge of said technology use it in a very incorrect, soulless form. Zhang wanted to depict a modern, contemporary China, in an attempt to not be repetitive and copy what he did in 2008. However, he still did plagiarism by heavily copying himself from the 2018 handover, plus a couple of things from 2008, although not too obvious for a person less critical as myself. Sadly, just as with technology, having a guy with a massive curriculum such as Zhang Yimou is not a warranty either since even a well oiled gear can also fail sometimes. Like i said before, Zhang should preferably focus in Wuxia and ancient themese, which is what always works out better for him. And to be fair, his latest works are a far cry to what he did in the 2000s, so I guess his work quality has also been taking a nosedive like this ceremony did at halftime. At least with Tokyo, we all knew it was gonna be a mess, but Beijing had no excuses at all to fail: A well known director, a large stadium which wasn't gonna be used for sports, a general pattern of not being stingy with their sport ceremonies. All of this caused a genuine hype which also just helped to further increase the dissapointment of the actual show we got. For a country which regime is part of the Anti-West Cool Guys Club which love to ridiculize the West due to openness and Global homogeneization (aka Globohomo as many far right wingers love to call it despectively), I actually laughed hard to the fact their choice of soundtrack was heavily westernized without a trace of traditional, autoctonous culture....yet again reminding us of the CCP and its contant feel of contempt toward tradition, as they keep flip flopping between praising it or attempting to destroy it as we saw in the 60's during the Cultural Revolution. (despite it still being very popular with the chinese youth). Imagine should be forbidden from every Olympic ceremony after tonight, but given how Tomas Bach lives in Wonderland and refuses to wake up and smell the coffee, single handedly destroying Olympism forever, I'm afraid we'll hear this Kumbaya song yet again in Paris. Sadly, Olympic Ceremonies as we used to know them, as long as the current world trends and the current morons in charge of IOC and ceremonies (i'm looking at you, Balich) are not going to return in a long while. Makes me wonder if I should keep bothering at all to watch them live again in two years. Anyway, for those interested, China is doing the Universiade and Asian Games this year as well. I heard the Asian Games theme will be of folk/traditional history of the Hangzhou region, so there is still hope they try redeeming themselves from last night mess. Sorry for the wall of text.
    2 points
  2. This cauldron is just as underwhelming as the opening ceremonies were. Big fat fail from China on all aspects - the medals are uninspired, the cauldron is a joke, the ceremonies were meh, the color palette of the indoor venues is dull.
    2 points
  3. Was it? For what I saw on the official feed, most of the pics were from China
    2 points
  4. Well, nice news to wake up to - Jakara Anthony wins Australia’s first gold of the games (and first winter gold since 2010) in the moguls.
    1 point
  5. As the IOC practically begs Salt Lake City to save the 2030 Olympics while cities like Vancouver and Sapporo struggle with public support, after watching Calgary which could have had the Olympics given to them on a silver platter in the 2026 race fall apart following a "no" note on a referendum, never mind the likes of Munich, Sion, Hamburg, the list goes on; the IOC has a problem that they are either incapable of addressing or they don't want to address and that's public support. Recent bidding cycles have shown the IOC's message isn't getting through. The reason isn't because of expensive bidding cycles, it's because citizens in many democratic countries are asking themselves "what benefit does hosting the Olympics bring?" The IOC has not been able to reach out on a grassroots level to address this problem despite the so-called New Norm and Agenda 2020, both noble efforts, but they haven't addressed the root problem. Lots of talk gets mentioned about Sochi's overspending but while I agree that was a catalyst, the problem goes back further, I'd argue to the Great Recession when people started asking themselves what governments were spending their tax money on and whether or not it was worthwhile. That's where the No Olympics movement really took hold. Before the 2022 race where the candidates dropped like flies then when Oslo finally said no thanks and the IOC gave them a tongue lashing that still stings leaving them with Almaty and Beijing, there were warning signs in the 2018 race when only three candidates came forward, one of which would never have made the short list in Annecy though today, France could offer up Annecy with eth exact same plan and it would be welcomed with open arms. Pyeongchang was overbudget and has struggled with legacy of its venues, Tokyo has been discussed ad nauseum, Rio and Athens are classic examples of spending beyond your means. Now to the IOC's credit, they did attempt to address the issue with the encouragement of existing and temporary venues to keep costs down but only to a point. Recall that while Tokyo was planning, the organizers proposed using existing venues for aquatics, volleyball, and rowing yet the IOC along with the respective federations raised enough of a fuss to get new venues built that now sit as white elephants and never saw their full Olympic capacity, not to mention all the cash Tokyo had to shell out for the postponement, and the IOC wonder why public support in Sapporo isn't better than what it is. The IOC quickly moved to lock up a double awarding with Paris and Los Angeles, both not only with strong public support, but also are two of the most ready-to-go SOGs hosts in history. Yet when the 2026 race rolled around, it was practically a repeat of what happened in 2022 with candidates dropping out. Rather than address the public support problem, they chose to focus on the bidding process itself and we get the result of 2032. There isn't attempt and maybe the thought process is as long as one candidate is willing and able to pay for the party with reasonably good public support then that's all they need. There was a feeble attempt by the IOC to drum up public support for Calgary's 2026 bid but it failed miraculously especially when John Coates showed up and famously told the media "the games won't cost you anything." Sure, one could argue the quote was taken out of context but it gave the opposition movement fresh ammunition and down the bid went. If the IOC ever wants to see bids from the likes of Switzerland, Germany, Austria, Norway, Canada, they have to find a way to engage at the grassroots level. They could go a long way towards that by getting rid of two of the individuals largely responsible for this mess, John Coates and Thomas Bach, who have been as caustic to the Olympic movement as battery acid. When a business is failing, you bring in new leadership. Rather the IOC message we've changed. Nothing's changed. The New Norm is a targeting process which I cannot fault the IOC for because even with the Agenda 2020 reforms, realistically when it comes to the SOGs the only places in the world that can pull it off at a reasonable cost with existing infrastructure are the USA, Russia, Western Europe, Japan, Korea, Australia, and China. Forget Africa, South America, and India. The IOC already went down the developing road with Rio and we saw the legacy there. The list is even less for the WOGs. Changing leadership would be a start. Next the IOC has to give a compelling reason to get the public on board, national pride is not enough. Taxpayers are looking at where there money goes. They want to see a return on their investments and rightly so. Barcelona and London had two of the most compelling PR campaigns that I can remember. That's what the IOC needs to get back to. The other major factor is the IOC needs upcoming Olympics to come in on budget. Huge cost overruns are a killer when it comes to public support. Brisbane has given a ridiculously low number which they've since revised, but can they stick to it? That's a key question. If they can, perhaps we public support shift in favor of more candidates coming forward. Same with Milan in 2026. Keeping costs down will go a long way. Even so, will the IOC bend. In the WOGs they've encouraged the use of existing venues such as the sliding track which new ones leave questionable legacies. Can they do the same for the SOGs with the likes of the velodrome, canoe/slalom course, and most importantly, the much maligned athletics stadium? It remains to be seen , but if the IOC thinks that their PR problems have been solved because of Agenda 2020, the New Norm, or because some politician or local businessman decides to put out a press release saying such and such a city should bid for an Olympics, they are gravely mistaken. But again, all they need is one host and if it's the likes of Putin's Russia or Xi's China that wants to step forward and put on an expensive show, the IOC will gladly oblige.
    1 point
  6. Props for supporting the athletes by your dedication in reassuring us that the stadium floor they walked on was the greatest achievement ever in Olympic history!
    1 point
  7. That ight just be due to the design of the torch/cauldron, though. Check out the photos of the torch relay posted on the organizing committee's website.
    1 point
  8. "Kids with doves" scene in OC sparked political speculations on Chinese social media A report on HK news site hk01.com, later picked up by Taiwan News: The report later clarified that this snippet is in fact an impromptu from Tian Tian, director of this chapter. She said that during rehearsal, one kid was trailing behind others and was led back into the team, and because "this is a very warm picture, very warm and very happy", she included it in the final program. The "trailing dove" scene: https://cdn.hk01.com/media/images/dw/20220205/566657797995892736265710.mp4 Chinese Communist Youth League post on Weibo: Meme from Weibo: text reads: (upper) "Let's return home!"; (lower) "Taiwan"
    1 point
  9. Scenes from their country as athletes marched past? Wow, it looks like in the Parade of Nations that athletes could see scenes from their own country on the huge LED high definition screen on the stadium floor as they marched in on it. How cool is that! What a welcome for them.
    1 point
  10. Exactly - just seen it on the BBC and it looks really good but you can't see the flame at all. I bet the energy used to both make it and keep it moving throughout the games is probably as much as the energy saved by not having a proper cauldron too. Maybe this is the cost of offsetting all the fake snow? Wouldn't be surprised if they keep changing the torch in it too as there doesn't look to be anything powering it.
    1 point
  11. So this is the winner of Sanremo, a familiar and a new face: https://youtu.be/Te236EDr_-k Two tattooed guys in what can easily be taken as a gay love song…I doubt that would get past the CCP censors for inclusion in the handover
    1 point
  12. Oh, I just remembered one very close to home. A very long serving member of GamesBids got himself a job volunteering for LOCOG. In the immediate lead-up to the 2012 opening he posted warnings here on the board to stop posting any pics or footage from the OC rehearsals, and warning us that any such posts were being monitored.
    1 point
  13. Mt thoughts about the ceremony: - Even when I didn’t have my expectation too high, due to we were facing the second “pandemic ceremony” and having too fresh in mind what Tokyo offered us just few months ago, adding the limited time they had (just 100 minutes) you couldn’t expect a show that could top Vancouver or Sochi. With all those limitations, what Beijing, in its second opening ceremony at the same Bird Nest Stadium, made a ceremony that I can say more than “good”. Also, we couldn’t expect a mass show (despite of what we saw for the China National Games even fewer months ago) since it was going to be carried out according to the Olympic protocol under strict covid rules. Yimou replaced mass for high tech. And really it was HIGH TECH! with a ceremony based on aerials and last generation LED screens with motion sensors… taking the technology for ceremonies to a new level. - The environment seemed a lot more vivid and cheerful than the Tokyo’s mourning-style. We could feel again that it was an Opening Ceremony and not a tribute to everyone and everything that lasted 4 hours (or 2 in this case). - The segments were mixed with the protocol and it may interrupt the anxiety we can feel when we watch an Opening Ceremony. Anyway, the segments were truly lavish! - We are getting used to “videos countdown” since London (despite it had a “stadium” London) and Beijing 2022 was not the exception. Coincidentally, February 4 marks the beginning of the spring according to the 24 solar terms of the Chinese lunar year and the 24th Winter Olympics. - Visually stunning, the first impression of the green brunches (which their colours reminded me “Pindorama” segment from Rio 2016) could lead to the first “wow” factor after Rio, totally absent in Tokyo and PyeonChang. - The Chinese flag welcome was a hint of what we saw in 2008 ceremony, adding modern factors, such the inclusion of “street” people and the children playing the trumpet interpretating a piece of music from an Old Chinese movie. - Then, the high tech started in majesty: the Chinese ink becoming the Yellow river, “flooding” the stadium was another stunning moment. We could appreciate, at that moment, that we were facing a replacement from the classic mass Chinese shows to a High tech show. I loved the ice arising from the floor, following the tradition of the Winter Games of remembering all the previous edition (which was skipped in Sochi) and then breaking the ice to emerge the Olympic rings. This maybe my favourite part of the ceremony. It called my attention that for the 1960 Winter Games, we could red “Lake Tahoe” instead the official name of the games: “Squaw Valley”… why? - The parade was fast, entertaining and cheerful. The snowflakes, as the plaques, was unique but not original. In 2015 we could see LED panels as plaques for the Opening Ceremony of the Pan Am Games in Toronto. - The ceremony continued at Yimou style: cheering people walking through the interactive panel discovering images of people around the world, another hint of what we saw before the torch lighting in 2008 when Li Ning, flying, discovered the route of the flame ass he passed by. - A new version of “imagine” was played. At this point I don’t know if this song belongs to the new Olympic Protocol for ceremonies, such as double flag bearers, joint oaths and the next host country marching next to last. I think that after listening to “imagine” in Torino, London (at least it was the country of the author), PyeongChang and Tokyo we’d had more than enough… What’s next? Someone singing “imagine” in French version on the Seine River? - The peace segment was unified with the Torch Segment. One by one the barely known torch, was approaching to what all of us were expecting: the cauldron that was going to be lit in an “unprecedent” way, while a children song was used as the background. By the way, that was another visually stunning high-tech segment. - Effectively, the flame was “lit” in an unprecedent way: NO CAULDRON AT ALL! Just was the torch which was put in the middle of the giant floating snowflakes, formed by the names of the countries which were the plaques on the parade…. But OK, Yimou thinks in everything: Did the flame from Olympia arrive to the stadium? Yes Is the Olympic Flame present in the ceremony? Yes Is now, what was condemned to be the most infamous Olympic torch of the history, worldwide well-known? Yes OK… Mission accomplished! They appealed to sustainability and no gas emission… what about the fireworks, then? This “lighting” of the cauldron ceremony left in me the feeling of… “it is not over, yet”… An original, but weird, maybe, the weirdest idea for the Olympic Flame. My conclusion: no taking in consideration the “no cauldron” factor (who broke the most important tradition for an opening ceremony, turning it into a sort of “queen’s baton” relay) it was a simple, short, well done and impressive ceremony. A pandemic ceremony, well executed who successfully replaced the (may be ancient) mass segments by stunning technology… OK, Beijing… you didn’t right!!!
    1 point
  14. If there's anything that handover's has taught us lately, is that we shouldn't get too excited about them anymore. Remember how brilliant the Tokyo 2020 handover was back in Rio 2016. Plus, with strict Corona restrictions in Beijing 2022, can't see the Milan handover being as good as Turin's (which I don't even remember anyway lol).
    1 point
  15. The fundamental hypocrisy of the IOC is that they claim to be about uniting the world. And they'll claim credit when North Korea and South Korea march together in the opening ceremony. But they'll distance themselves when it doesn't work in their favor (i.e. China) and they'll say it's not their job to police the world. Yes, 100% they want to believe they're a bunch of autocrats that should have someone to wipe their asses for them for bestowing the Olympics upon a city. Hopefully once we're past Beijing and there are no questionable host countries on the horizon, that image will improve. But at some point, they'll likely need to face a future again where their options are limited and they need to demand less or else they don't get an Olympic host
    1 point
  16. Calgary was never the favourite for 2026. Even when public support looked strongest, most surveys still showed Milan on top. The IOC is only the cherry on top of a heaping pile of **** that is the entire sporting infrastructure. Look at how influential various 'royals' from across the middle east are. The IOC has many members that are questionable beyond that as well. The organization has had a rather high turnover in the last 5 years and that probably needs to continue. But as long as the federations are still lacking in their own executive quality, the IOC in turn will be lacking as well. This is all not to say that the perception is not fully accurate, especially with regards to the money. I believe the IOC still has to file disclosure information to the IRS for various reasons. It is not like Bach is lining is pockets with NBC money despite the common media perceptions would have you believe. Pound was right though, not making a bad choice is more important then making the perfect choice. For 2022 the IOC made the bad choice before the vote. And sicne only a few years later they were willing to find the money to make the right choice is all the more problematic. And I am not convinced Paris pulling off a Los Angeles/Sydney/London level Games will do much. Because London didn't. Maybe not being followed by the poison pill that was Sochi might help but who knows. I have said it before, the IOC needs to accept whatever conditions Austria/Germany/Switzerland/Norway place to get a winter games into the Western European market again soon.
    1 point
  17. Unfortunately despots like Bach and Coates tend to have reliable tickers - just look at Trump or Mugabe.
    1 point
  18. I bet at the closing ceremony... the scroll would be closed with some sort of images in these 2 weeks.... and then passed on to London!!
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...